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Technology

Technology

  • Global Cloud Technology Survey – Announcing the Results!

    In February and March 2012, TechSoup Global and its global network of partner organisations, including SANGONeT via the SANGOTeCH Technology Donation Programme, conducted a survey of NGOs around the world to better understand current cloud computing usage and future plans for cloud computing adoption.

    The survey garnered more than 10 500 respondents from 88 countries.

    The results are in.

    SANGOTeCH is pleased to add this information to our ever-evolving resources for NPOs, charities, foundations, and the stakeholders who support them.

    SANGOTeCH has published a paper with the key findings of the survey in the hope that the information will enable NPOs to make informed IT decisions.

    We encourage you to review the findings, learn about the current state of cloud computing in NPOs around the world, and find out how your organisation stacks up.

    By better understanding the technological tools that NPOs currently use, as well as their future plans and requirements, SANGOTeCH can work with its partner organisations to provide NPOs with the resources they need to operate at their full potential.

    To read the full report, refer to www.sangotech.org/global-cloud-computing-study.

    More about SANGOTeCH:

    The SANGOTeCH online technology donation portal is a joint initiative between SANGONeT and TechSoup Global. Launched in South Africa in December 2006, it assists NGOs by providing software and hardware for very low or discounted fees in conjunction with ICT donor partners (e.g. Microsoft, SAP, Symantec, etc.), as well as by supporting NGOs to maximise their ICT purchases and infrastructure. Since inception, this initiative has resulted in savings of more than R120 million for the NGO sector in South Africa.

    SANGONeT has already expanded SANGOTeCH to Botswana and Kenya, with the aim of covering the whole Southern African region by 2013.

  • More ICT4D Please!

    This is a response to a blog post published last week by Eric Hersman, also known as the @WhiteAfrican - The Subtle Condescension of “ICT4D”.

    I have been involved in a range of ICT4D issues in South Africa and beyond over the course of the 11 years I have worked for SANGONeT. Last week we hosted the 7th annual SANGONeT “ICT for Civil Society” conference in Johannesburg which focused on ICTs for rural development (ICT4RD) in Africa under the theme “Rural Realities, Real Solutions”. It is these experiences that compel me to comment on the mentioned article and respond to some of the issues Hersman raises.

    Hersman begins his article with the statement:

    “I have cognitive dissonance over the term “ICT4D“. The term “ICT4D” is confusing, hypocritical and has a whiff of condescension that makes me cringe. As I understand it, it’s what NGO’s do in places like Africa and Asia, but if the same things are done in poor communities in the US or Europe, it’s not called ICT4D, it’s called civil society innovation or a disruptive product.”

    It is not so much what (the ICT4D issue) Hersman raises in the article - although the relevance, success and impact of ICT4D initiatives in Africa should be assessed in a critical manner - but rather, how and from which position he raises these issues.

    Confronting and responding to Africa's development challenges, and technology’s role within this, is a complex and definitely not light hearted issue. Raising these issues for the sake of “testing the waters” or getting people worked up does not make sense to me. Especially if you as the author of the article is a perfect example of what ICT4D in Africa represents - coming up with great ideas which attract funding support and ultimately result in opportunities to contribute to meaningful and longterm development - or - just opportunities to “do things in the name of development” without fully understanding the issues to be addressed of the longterm commitment required to ensure meaningful impact.

    For someone who has been very prominent in the African ICT4D space, Eric Hersman’s role and contribution definitely fit into the former and not latter scenario.

    Development is also not simply a term “owned” by international agencies and other stakeholders to motivate and justify their presence in and support to Africa – it refers to improvement, empowerment, progress, innovation, etc. It is about moving to something better and more meaningful than what the current situation represents.

    From an “international development perspective”, it is no longer what you can do for Africa but rather what you can do with Africa in support of the needs and aspirations articulated by Africans. Any different perspective on the role of international development support is problematic, to say the least.

    Technology has an important role to play in the future development and prosperity of the continent. It contributes to economic growth and innovation on the one side, and supports efforts that address Africa’s historical development challenges on the other.

    These two issues represent different sides to the same coin – but often require very different approaches, and different roleplayers, to achieve the desirable objectives.

    Whatever you prefer to call technology is irrelevant - IT / ICT / ICT4D / ICT4RD / M4D/ Tech4Dev, etc. What really matters is the intent, the objectives and the motivation for using it.

    But, technology for technology’s stake is downright stupid.

    Too many technology for development projects and interventions fail because of the emphasis on the technology without understanding the development issue/s and/or what it would take to ensure the implementation of the technology will ultimately achieve success and impact. Too many technology competitions, awards and challenges place too much focus on the development of “more new tools” rather on what has been achieved.

    Hersman also asks the following question:

    “If an ICT4D-type project is done in a poor part of America, is it still considered ICT4D?”

    In my opinion the answer is – no! Why? Because if a First World country - with all the necessary technology and resources at its disposal - wastes its resources on meaningless external political objectives, while allowing a morally bankrupt financial system to cripple its economy, and as a result of all of this, neglects the needs of its own people, then you can’t compare it to the historical situation and development challenges which characterise many African countries.

    Africa has also wasted many opportunities over the past few decades to improve its socio-economic situation. There is no excuse for this and sadly, future generations will continue to suffer from this. However, this does not mean that the international community should turn their backs on Africa or use it as an excuse to disengage from the continent. It should also not be a reason to think about Africa as a great place to go test and showcase technology not relevant to the needs of the continent or to make a quick buck out of the misery of others. There is no place for these practices anywhere and they definitely have nothing to contribute to either the development or ICT4D objectives of the continent.

    We need home-grown technology innovation to stimulate and drive economic growth which will impact the African economy at large. This will result in competitive and sustainable businesses, profits, job creation, etc.

    We also need home-grown technology innovation to support efforts aimed at addressing social development challenges such as health, education, etc. facing the continent – so called ICT4D interventions and applications.

    But while technology is the common factor, the enabling environment, support structures and related issues in dealing with these two imperatives are very different.

    In recent years, a number of African countries, particularly Kenya, South Africa and others, have developed a reputation for technology innovation and success - both in terms of big mainstream businesses (e.g. MTN, etc.) as well as small, dynamic, technology start-ups. Often the latter initiatives evolve without any special government, investment or regulatory support.

    However, big IT business and small start-ups alone will not ensure that all Africans benefit from the potential contribution and impact of technology. Other interventions are also required.

    Governments, international development agencies, the private sector and other stakeholders continue to commit millions of dollars to technology for development – so called ICT4D – projects in Africa. Many international conferences (e.g. annual SANGONeT conference), reports, publications, panels of experts, etc. also continue to focus on ICT4D issues.

    Are all these efforts a total waste of money? Why would Eric Hersman be cynical about these efforts or what they are collectively referred to if his own claim to fame – Ushahidi, etc – is build, maintained, celebrated, supported and rolled-out all over the world with funding from various key international institutions.

    I call this hypocritical.

    Hersman should know better than to articulate these sentiments in a way that sounds condescending and patronising, especially while he presents himself as the "White African" committed to helping Africa through the power of technology innovation.

    It is true that the impact of many ICT4D initiatives is sometimes difficult to determine and their scale and scope often are too limited to have meaningful impact. However, questioning their overall intent is hugely problematic! What needs to be questioned is their focus, objectives and ultimately, impact. Africa’s development challenges remain significant, and will take many more generations to address. If technology is one of the vehicles to achieve this objective, then more should be done to nurture and expand its contribution and impact – by both local and international stakeholders.

    The fact that the majority of people on the African continent today have access to a mobile phone unfortunately does not represent development and empowerment. It is a remarkable achievement, but more needs to be done for the full potential of ICTs to impact the lives of all Africans.

    As highlighted in the draft National Development Plan released by South Africa’s National Planning Commission (NPC) last week, “Despite the uptake of mobile phones, growth in SA's ICT sector has not brought affordable, universal access to a full range of communications services.”

    That is the real challenge.

    Finally, there are now a billion people living on the African continent. Their future is closely intertwined. The success and failure of some will have a direct bearing on others. We all need to do more in ensuring a better life for all on this continent.

    Many Africans go the extra mile every day in responding to the challenges facing us. They don't do it to win awards or be famous, but just to make a difference in the lives of others.

    There is also more than one real “White African” serious about making a contribution to the future of this continent.

  • Microsoft's "ICTs for NGOs" Day in JHB

    As part of its aims to strengthen its role and contribution to the NGO sector, Microsoft, together with SANGONeT will be hosting a one-day seminar on 15 March 2010 at the Microsoft offices in Bryanston, Johannesburg, to discuss ways in which NGOs can use ICTs more strategically.

    In the State of ICTs in the South African NGO Sector 2009 survey, conducted by World Wide Worx on behalf of SANGONeT, and sponsored by Microsoft and the NDA, it was found that technology is increasingly impacting on all aspects of the NGO sector.

    The study showed that for the first time NGO decision-makers are becoming adept at cutting edge tools like mobile applications and social networking services. However, these are mostly being used in their personal capacity, with half of all respondents using local social networking services, but only 6% of them using it in pursuit of the goals of their organisations. The benefit of the pervasiveness of the personal use of advanced tools will be a faster adoption of these tools and methodologies, going forward. It is anticipated that many new platforms and applications, primarily focused on mobility, will become the mainstay of technology adoption in the NGO sector.

    So, how do NGOs start using these tools effectively in their work?

    By means of their relevant products, building relationships and partnerships with strategic role players in the NGO, government and private sectors; and to provide leadership and guidance to the Southern African NGO sector as far as ICT issues are concerned, Microsoft seeks to answer that question. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to learn how ICTs can be used more strategically in your organisation.

    If you would like to attend this event, please contact Nhlanhla Kunene at SANGONeT on telephone: 011 381 3408 or email: nhlanhla@sangonet.org.za .

    Seminar Agenda


    Time Session Speaker
    09:00 - 09:15 Welcome Vis Naidoo, Microsoft
    09:15-10:00 NGOs & ICTs: Challenges & Opportunities Mahad Ibrahim
    10:00-10:30 Supporting NGOs SANGONeT                
    10:30-11:00 Coffee Break  
    11:00-11:30 The Partners in Learning Programme Razan Roberts, Microsoft
    11:20-13h00 What Microsoft Offers to NGOs Microsoft & SANGOTeCH
    13:00-14:00 Lunch  
    14:00-15:00 Windows 7: Why NGOs should adopt Microsoft Expert
    15:00-15:30 Project Management: Using technology to manage your projects more effectively Microsoft Expert
    15:30-16h00 Hosted Solutions: reducing the work you have to do... Microsoft Expert
    16h00 Beat the traffic networking cocktail  






    Event start date: 
    15/03/2010
    Event end date: 
    15/03/2010
    Event venue: 
    Microsoft Offices, Bryanston
    Event type: 
    Seminar
    Contact person(s): 
  • Donations of Windows 8 Are Now Available Through SANGOTeCH!

    Windows 8 is here!

    Eligible organisations can now request donated upgrades of Windows 8 Professional and Enterprise editions through the Microsoft Software Donation Programme at SANGOTeCH.

    With a new mobile-friendly design that includes sleek tiles in the place of conventional icons, Windows 8 features an innovative update to the traditional Windows environment. It keeps some aspects of what we are all used to from Windows XP and Windows 7. But it drops the 'Start' button in favour of a new, app-integrated look and easier syncing with cloud-based services. There are also numerous improvements 'under the hood', such as a smaller memory footprint, faster performance than Windows 7, and reduced disk-space requirements.

    If you have received a donation of a Windows operating system through SANGOTeCH that included Software Assurance (and it is still current), you can upgrade to Windows 8 at no additional cost.

    Easily See What You Can Request

    To help you manage your Microsoft donations, we have created the Microsoft Donation Centre. Organisations can easily track what donations they have received so far, what remains of their software allotment, when their cycle resets, and the value of their Microsoft software donations to date. To access the Donation Centre, log into your SANGOTeCH account.

    SANGOTeCH has also published two resources which will assist your organisation to decide whether it should upgrade to Windows 8, as well as how to upgrade to Windows 8.

    Click here to learn more about SANGOTeCH and Microsoft's latest Windows 8 release.

    Also view the product catalogue for other technology products available at SANGOTeCH.

    SANGOTeCH Support
    Web: www.sangotech.org
    Email: support@sangotech.org
    Tel: 086 110 6443
    Fax: 086 685 9191
  • R25 000 Prize for 1st Code4Democracy Hackathon

    The Open Data and Democracy Initiative (ODADI) coalition is hosting its first 48-hour Code4Democracy Hackathon.

    Digital activists, designers, developers and data journalists will kickstart South Africa’s open data movement from 4-5 August 2012 in Cape Town at a 48-hour hackathon to build web and software applications that will help make government more accountable.

    The Code4Democracy event is the first public gathering hosted by the new ODADI (Open Data & Democracy Initiative) coalition, and will offer R25 000 in cash prizes and tech support for ideas that have the potential to empower ordinary citizens, make government more transparent, or make public services more efficient and open.

    The initiative echos similar campaigns that have revolutionised the way that civic debate and public accountability works everywhere from Kenya and Ghana, to further north in the USA and Europe. ODADI hopes to build on South Africa’s early support for theOpen Government Partnership, by inspiring a grassroots data-driven movement in South Africa, giving ordinary citizens the tools and information they need to make better informed choices about public issues.

    ODADI is a broad-based volunteer-led non-partisan movement, that bases its principles on the Constitution, and does not align itself with any political party or other political interest group.

    The Code4Democracy hackathon has been made possible via a seed grant from the African Media Initiative’s prototype fund for civic engagement, as well as through logistic support from the Open Society Foundation’s Money & Politics Project (MaPP) and venue and material support from Cape Town’s Ndifuna Ukwazi center for active citizenship.

    HacksHackers Cape Town is a founding member of ODADI and a lead organiser of the Code4Democracy hackathon. Other ODADI coalition members assisting with the Code4Democracy hackathon include the Open Democracy Advice Centre, the Parliamentary Monitoring Group, the Right2Know campaign, and the Silicon Cape initiative.

    To read the article titled, “Gustav Praekelt to deliver keynote at Code4Democracy,” click here.

     

    Source: 
    Google+
  • 3D Printing for Development Workshop

    SANGONeT/House for Hack

    3D Printing for Development Workshop

    SANGONeT in partnership with House4Hack and  techfortrade will be hosting a 3D for Development workshop with specific focus on 3D Printing on 22 May 2012 in Centurion, Pretoria
    What is 3D Printing?

    3D printing is an emerging technology that's generating increasing excitement among technologists and trend watchers. It is a process of making three dimensional (3D) solid objects from a digital file. 3D printing is achieved using additive processes, where an object is created by laying down successive layers of material.

    While 3D printers are already fulfilling niche roles in small and medium-sized businesses, it is easy to start imagining practical applications of 3D printers in underserved areas. 3D printing reduces the costs of manufacturing in several ways and could make the act of ‘making’ something that smaller organisations and non-profits could embrace on behalf of their communities. 3D printing lowers the cost of raw materials, design and engineering, and retooling and retraining.

    To see practical examples and to learn more about 3D printing and related trends, join SANGONeT, House4Hack and techfortrade as we discover ways in which 3D printing can impact the South African nonprofit sector.

    Date: 22 May 2012
    Where: 4 Burger Ave, Lyttleton Manor, Centurion, Pretoria
    Time: 9.30am

    To sign-up for this workshop, visit the 3D4D Challenge website. It is a free workshop but seating is limited so register early to avoid disappointment.

    For more information about 3D4D, read our press release.

    For more about techfortrade, refer to www.techfortrade.org.                         

    For more about the House 4 Hack, refer to www.house4hack.co.za.

    Event start date: 
    22/05/2012
    Event end date: 
    22/05/2012
    Event venue: 
    4 Burger Ave, Lyttleton Manor, Centurion, Pretoria
    Event type: 
    Workshop
  • WSIS Forum 2011 unites governments with grassroots to re-energize the development agenda

    World leaders are gathering in Geneva this week to work on strategies to more effectively harness the power and reach of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to accelerate progress towards the Millennium Development Goals in crucial areas like health and education.

    Co-organized by ITU, UNESCO, UNCTAD and UNDP, the World Summit on the Information Society (16-20 May) is the world’s largest annual gathering of the world’s ‘ICT for development’ community, including UN agencies, governments, civil society and ICT industry representatives.

    Guest speakers at this morning’s opening ceremony included Ministers and deputies from 17 countries, including Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Burundi, El Salvador, Finland, Gambia, Ghana, India, Mexico, Montenegro, Oman, Philippines, Poland, the Russian Federation, Serbia, and the United Arab Emirates.

    Delegates also heard interventions from ITU Secretary-General, Dr Hamadoun Touré; Supachai Panitchpakdi, Secretary-General of UNCTAD; Juan Somavia, Director-General of the ILO; Janis Karklins, Deputy-Director of UNESCO; Mohamed Nasser Al Ghanim, Director-General, Telecommunications Regulatory Authority of the United Arab Emirates; John Davis, Vice-President, Intel Corporation and General Manager of Intel’s World Ahead Program, and Cyril Ritchie, President of the Conference on NGOs in Consultative Relationship with the UN (CoNGO).

    This year’s WSIS Forum also welcomes more than 70 Members of Parliament and many other senior government figures. Over 1,000 representatives from around 140 countries are expected to attend the week-long event.

    In his opening address, Dr Touré stressed the importance of broadband to national economic and social development. “I think we are all very much aware of how close we are to the 2015 deadline for meeting the WSIS targets and the Millennium Development Goals. We have made quite extraordinary progress in terms of connectivity, the creation of an enabling environment, and cybersecurity. The next major step must be to repeat the ‘mobile miracle’ for broadband Internet,” he said.

    The Forum will also serve as the venue for the UN Group on the Information Society’s first meeting of the open consultation process on the overall review of the implementation of the WSIS outcomes. Stakeholders will jointly brainstorm on the action plan for the Review Process (WSIS+10), to be held 10 years after the conclusion of the Summit, as recommended in the Tunis Agenda.

    In addition to reviewing progress towards the WSIS targets set for 2015, this year’s WSIS Forum will foster interactive debate and information exchange on a wide range of key topics such as rural development, multilingualism, environmental sustainability, education, healthcare and innovation.

    The opening ceremony was followed by a High Level session, Working Together Towards 2015. Ongoing High-level Dialogues throughout the course of the week include:
    • Right to Communication
    • Innovation for Digital Inclusion
    • ICTs to Enable Least Developed Countries
    • Building Confidence and Security in Cyberspace
    Alongside an exhibition component, the Forum offers participants a diverse range of meetings and activities, including Interactive WSIS Action Line Facilitators Meetings, Interactive Sessions, Country and Thematic Workshops and Knowledge Exchanges. Afternoon sessions each day will also feature the release of a number of new publications and briefings from participating organizations. The Forum programme also includes the Parliamentary Forum as well as meetings of the Internet Governance Forum.

    The WSIS agenda is the result of a comprehensive open consultation process involving all stakeholders. Spanning three phases, this year’s process welcomed 150 contributions from 50 countries.

    Remote participation is an integral component of the WSIS Forum 2011. Each session can be viewed remotely at: http://groups.itu.int/wsis-forum2011/Home.aspx.

    This year’s WSIS Forum 2011 programme has been greatly enhanced thanks to the strategic partnership and contribution of the United Arab Emirates. The Forum has also benefited from contributions of Oman for the series of workshops, and Mexico for Spanish interpretation.

    Videos, photos, live and archived webcasts, and transcripts of speeches can be found at the event Newsroom at www.itu.int/net/pressoffice/wsis/index.aspx , or on the main event website at http://groups.itu.int/wsis-forum2011/Home.aspx. Follow the event on Twitter at #WSIS.

    For more information, please contact:

    Sarah Parkes
    Chief, Media Relations & Public Information
    ITU
    Tel: +41 22 730 6135
    Mobile: +41 79 599 1439
    E-mail: sarah.parkes@itu.int

    Jaroslaw K. Ponder
    Strategy & Policy Advisor,
    ITU,
    Tel: +41 22 730 6065
    E-mail: jaroslaw.ponder@itu.int

    To view other NGO press releases, refer to www.ngopulse.org/group/home-page/pressreleases.

    Date published: 
    16/05/2011
    Organisation: 
    International Telecommunication Union
  • SANGONeT ICT4RD Conference 2011 - “Rural Realities, Real Solutions”

    Over three quarters of the world's poor live in rural areas. They often lack economic opportunities, have difficulty accessing basic services, have limited voice in governance and remain extremely vulnerable to shocks.

    How can development practice and approaches address these issues within the current financial constraints facing national budgets and donor funding? What are the new, innovative - and more cost effective - solutions and applications available to respond to rural development challenges in Africa and other parts of the developing world in a meaningful manner?

    The 7th Annual SANGONeT "ICTs for Civil Society" Conference, to be held from 1-3 November 2011 at the Wanderers Club in Illovo, Johannesburg, will focus on information communication technologies for rural development (ICT4RD) under the theme “Rural Realities, Real Solutions”.

    ICT4RD 2011 posits that part of the answer to the questions listed above will rely on new technologies - technologies like mobile phones - with coverage already reaching further than roads, electricity, sanitation and clean water.

    ICT4RD 2011 is the first African conference to apply these emerging technologies and practices to rural development, and will provide new thought leadership at a moment in time when the development sector is poised for innovation and change.

    ICT4RD 2011 will bring together 250-300 experts and practitioners - from government, NGOs, donor community, ICT sector, social entrepreneurs, investors and other stakeholder groups - from across Sub-Saharan Africa and beyond, to confront the realities of rural development and explore the innovative use of ICTs to catalyze the growth of ICT4RD solutions for scale.

    For more about ICT4RD 2011 and to register, refer to www.ngopulse.org/ict4rd.

    Follow updates about the event on Facebook, or Twitter, or by replying to ict4rd@ngopulse.org.

    SANGONeT Conference Team
    August 2011


    Related article:

    There's Not an App for That
  • Microsoft "ICTs for NGOs" Day - East London

    Microsoft and SANGONeT will be hosting a one-day "ICTs for NGOs" event on Thursday, 12 May 2011 (09h00-13h00), at the Premier Hotel Regent in East London.

    Participants will have the opportunity to highlight and discuss the ICT challenges and opportunities facing NGOs, and learn about new ICT applications and solutions available from Micorosoft.

    As part of the programme, SANGONeT will highlight new technology offerings available to NGOs through SANGOTeCH.

    Refer to the programme for the event listed below.

    Don’t miss out on this opportunity to learn how ICTs can be used more strategically in your NGO.

    Participation is free of charge.

    To register and confirm your participation, please forward your name, designation, organisation and e-mail address to Botswang Kgeledi at SANGONeT on botswang@sangonet.org.za by Wednesday, 11 May 2011.

    For a map and directions to the venue, click here.

    Programme:
    TimeTopic   Presenter
    08:30 - 09:00 Registration and Networking  
    09:00 - 09:10 Welcome and Introduction David Barnard, SANGONeT
    09:10 - 09:30 Overview of Citizenship and the Importance of NGOs and Public Institutions  Themba Mdlalose, Microsoft
    09:30 - 09:45 SANGOTeCH - Providing NGOs with Technology Botswang Kgeledi, SANGONeT
    09:45 - 10:10 Use of Mobile Technology for Social Change  Matthew de Gale, SANGONeT
    10:10 - 10:30 Cloud Computing  
    10:30 - 11:00 Serenic End-toEnd NGO Solution  Grant van der Westhuizen, Serenic
    11:00 - 11:20 ICT4D Case Study  Mymie Vos, NBI
    11:20 - 12:00 ICTs and NGOs - What are rhe Challenges and Opportunities Going Forward  
    12:00 - 12:15
     
    Evaluation and Closure
     
    David Barnard, SANGONeT & Themba Mdlalose, Microsoft
    12:15 - 13:00 Lunch and Networking  

    Event start date: 
    12/05/2011
    Event end date: 
    12/05/2011
    Event venue: 
    Premier Hotel Regent, 22 Esplanade, Beachfront, East London
    Event type: 
    Seminar
  • Microsoft "ICTs for NGOs" Day - Durban

    Microsoft and SANGONeT will be hosting a one-day "ICTs for NGOs" event on Tuesday, 10 May 2011 (09h00-13h00), at the Diakonia Centre in Durban.

    Participants will have the opportunity to highlight and discuss the ICT challenges and opportunities facing NGOs, and learn about new ICT applications and solutions available from Micorosoft.

    As part of the programme, SANGONeT will highlight new technology offerings available to NGOs through SANGOTeCH.

    Refer to the programme for the event listed below.

    Don’t miss out on this opportunity to learn how ICTs can be used more strategically in your NGO.

    Participation is free of charge.

    To register and confirm your participation, please forward your name, designation, organisation and e-mail address to Botswang Kgeledi at SANGONeT on Tel: 011 403 4935 or botswang@sangonet.org.za by Monday, 9 May 2011.

    Programme:

    TimeTopic

     

    Presenter

    08:30 - 09:00

    Registration and Networking

     

    09:00 - 09:10

    Welcome and Introduction

    David Barnard, SANGONeT

    09:10 - 09:30

    Overview of Citizenship and the Importance of NGOs and Public Institutions

     Themba Mdlalose, Microsoft

    09:30 - 09:45

    SANGOTeCH - Providing NGOs with Technology

    Botswang Kgeledi, SANGONeT

    09:45 - 10:10

    Use of Mobile Technology for Social Change

     Andi Friedman, Mobile Researcher

    10:10 - 10:30

    Cloud Computing

     

    10:30 - 11:00

    Serenic End-toEnd NGO Solution

     Grant van der Westhuizen, Serenic

    11:00 - 11:20

    ICT4D Case Study 

     Mymie Vos, NBI

    11:20 - 12:00

    ICTs and NGOs - What are rhe Challenges and Opportunities Going Forward

     

    12:00 - 12:15

     

    Evaluation and Closure

     

    David Barnard, SANGONeT & Themba Mdlalose, Microsoft

    12:15 - 13:00

    Lunch and Networking

     

    Event start date: 
    10/05/2011
    Event end date: 
    10/05/2011
    Event venue: 
    Diakonia Centre, 20 Diakonia Avenue, Durban
    Event type: 
    Seminar
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