HIV Infection Rate in Children Declines

Study reveals that new HIV infections in South African children under five years old have dropped by more than three quarters

According to a study conducted by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington, looking into the global burden of disease with a particular focus on HIV, tuberculosis (TB) and malaria, new HIV infections in South African children under five years old have dropped by more than three quarters between 2003 and 2013, from 56 000 to 7 600.

The authors of the study argue that the decrease in HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths in this age group is likely a result of the country’s ‘expanded access to child-focused intervention’ such as the prevention of mother-to-child transmission programmes. 

Christopher Murray, IHME director and an author of the study believes the global investment in HIV treatment is saving lives rapidly, but notes that the quality of antiretroviral programmes varies widely and in order to reduce HIV-related deaths even further, the country needs to learn from the best programmes and do away with the worst ones.

To read the article titled, “HIV infections in children under five down by over three quarters,” click here.

Source: 
Mail and Guardian

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