Deepfake porn is ruining women’s lives. Now the law may finally ban it

Helen Mort couldn’t believe what she was hearing. There were naked photos of her plastered on a porn site, an acquaintance told her. But never in her life had she taken or shared intimate photos. Surely there must be some mistake? When she finally mustered up the courage to look, she felt frightened and humiliated.
 
Mort, a poet and broadcaster in Sheffield, UK, was the victim of a fake pornography campaign. What shocked her most was that the images were based on photos, dated between 2017 and 2019, that had been taken from her private social media accounts, including a Facebook profile she’d deleted.
 
The perpetrator had uploaded these non-intimate images holiday and pregnancy photos and even pictures of her as a teenager and encouraged other users to edit her face into violent pornographic photos. While some were shoddily Photoshopped, others were chillingly realistic. When she began researching what had happened, she learned a new term: deepfakes, referring to media generated and manipulated by AI.

“It really makes you feel powerless, like you’re being put in your place,” she says. “Punished for being a woman with a public voice of any kind. That’s the best way I can describe it. It’s saying, ‘Look: we can always do this to you.’”

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Source: 
Technology Review

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