treatment

TAC Turns 14 Years Old

On 10 December 2012, the Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) turned 14 years old. Since we were born on the steps of St George’s Cathedral in Cape Town on International Human Rights Day in 1998, it seems like the world has changed. This year’s birthday comes at a time where many celebrate signs that we moving in the right direction due to expanded access to antiretroviral drugs (ARVs). This does not mean the war against HIV and AIDS is over, as many of us tend to forget where we come from and that the road ahead needs more focus.

Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation: Research Nurses - Fish Hoek

The Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation (DTHF) is a NGO that focuses on the pursuit of excellence in research, treatment, training and prevention of HIV and related infections in Southern Africa.

The DTHF seeks to appoint Research Nurses, based at its Youth Centre in Masiphumelele, Fish Hoek, Cape Town.

This is a one-year contract position renewable subject to funding availability and acceptable work performance.

Responsibilities:

NGO Protest Over ARV Shortage

With antiretroviral (ARV) drug shortages persisting in Gauteng, the Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) embarked on a boycott at a World AIDS Day function at the weekend.

A group demonstrated outside Sethokga hostel in Tembisa on 1 December 2012, where Gauteng Health MEC, Hope Papo, led an AIDS awareness campaign.

TAC’s Gauteng branch reportedly submitted a list of hospitals and clinics battling with antiretroviral drug shortages to the department. 

Attempts to Avert HIV are Off Target - Report

According to an authoritative United Nations report, the death toll is falling but there is still no hope for an end to the worldwide pandemic.

The report states that risky sexual behaviour is continuing around the globe and even increasing in some countries, threatening to derail efforts to stop transmission of the HIV virus and bring the AIDS epidemic to an end.

It further states that although drug treatment for people with HIV is saving millions of lives and deaths are falling, the prospects for stopping the spread of infection are not promising.

SANAC Welcomes HIV Pill Breakthrough

The South African National AIDS Council (SANAC) has welcomed an announcement by Health Minister, Aaron Motsoaledi, of a single daily pill to treat HIV.

HIV positive people on antiretrovirals will from next April take one pill a day instead of three, following the awarding of a R5.9 billion new tender to three pharmaceutical companies for the provision of antiretroviral drugs.

“We believe that this is a major benefit in terms of compliance; it also means that logistics and storage are reduced," states Motsoaledi.

An End to AIDS in Sight - UN Report

A United Nations (UN) report says that eradicating AIDS is in sight, owing to better access to drugs that can both treat and prevent the incurable human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes the disease.

The report also states that an aim to eventually end the worldwide AIDS pandemic is not ‘merely visionary’ but ‘entirely feasible’.

Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation: Research Nurses

The Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation (DTHF) is a NGO that focuses on the pursuit of excellence in research, treatment, training and prevention of HIV and related infections in Southern Africa.

The DTHF seeks to appoint Research Nurses, based at the Emavundleni Clinic in Crossroads, Cape Town.

This is a two-year contract position renewable subject to funding availability and acceptable work performance.

Responsibilities:

Acute ARV Shortage Hits Zimbabwe

According to an article by Paidamoyo Chipunza, an acute shortage of anti-retroviral drugs in public health institutions in Zimbabwe is reportedly forcing patients to switch to drug combinations which compromise their health.

Chipunza, who states that some hospitals are said to be offering ARVs meant for children to adults, warns that mixing different regimens can result in treatment failure because the virus is highly mutagenic and becomes drug resistant.

Devastating Impact of Global Fund Crisis

According to an article Richard Lee, everyone knew that the crisis at the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria will have a serious impact across Southern Africa, which is still the epicentre of the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

Lee, who says that no one knew how serious the crisis will be and/or what will be most affected, notes that new research from Malawi, Swaziland and Zimbabwe highlights how devastating the cancellation of Round 11 funding has been on the HIV and TB response in the region.

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