skills

skills

  • Grassroot Soccer: Office Administrator - Khayelitsha

    Grassroot Soccer South Africa
    Please note: this opportunity closing date has passed and may not be available any more.
    Opportunity closing date: 
    Wednesday, November 6, 2013
    Opportunity type: 
    Employment
    Grassroot Soccer (GRS) is a South African nonprofit organisation that uses the power of soccer to prevent HIV/AIDS. GRS trains local community-based youth role models as skills coaches to deliver comprehensive HIV prevention and life skills education through rigorously designed and evidence based curricula.

    Since that time, GRS has evolved into one of the leading sport for development public health NGOs. The organization’s global headquarters are in Norwich, VT with African headquarters in Cape Town, South Africa and additional offices in Zambia, Zimbabwe, and London.  The GRS team currently encompasses over 170 full time team members in five countries on three continents, as well as over 500 coaches in South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe. 

    GRC seeks to appoint an Office Administrator, based in in Khayelitsha, Cape Town.

    This is an opportunity for an exceptional person to join the team at Grassroot Soccer in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, South Africa. A truly innovative non-profit organisation, the people of GRS have the singular vision of a world mobilized through soccer to create an AIDS free generation.

    The Office Administrator must ensure that the program teams have the daily support to achieve their goals and targets. The Office Administrator works closely with the Site Coordinator to ensure that the site runs smoothly, meeting all the finance, HR and administration standards and is compliant with all policies and procedures. They are also the custodian of the site calendar, ensuring that all events, programmes and meetings are scheduled and minuted. This may include managing certain partner relationships as required by the Site Coordinator.  They may also take responsibility for planning special events and projects as required by the site.

    You are freakishly passionate about logistics, creating an organised place to work and ensuring that all administration seamlessly supports world class program delivery.  An individual who holds strong finance and administration experience, but who is looking to practice these skills in a unique, fun energetic environment focused on truly inspiring work will thrive in this role.  Continual innovation is at the core of who we are and we’re not afraid to lead from the front.  GRS isn’t for everyone, and a ‘fit’ with our culture is a must. You must have contagious positive energy, a passion for our mission, be self-motivated and demonstrate incredible teamwork.  We’re an organization comprised of refreshingly sharp, confident and committed individuals who truly thrive on the strength of the combined team – the whole at GRS is a great deal more than the sum of the parts. The OA will both thrive in, and make an enormous contribution to our unique and very special organization.
     
    Only exceptional candidates need to apply.

    To apply, submit a CV and motivation letter stating how you can make an extraordinary contribution to the organisation with the subject line “OA: Khayelitsha” in the subject line to people@grassrootsoccer.org.

    Please quote the source of this advertisement in your application - NGO Pulse Portal.

    We reserve the right not to make an appointment.

    For more about GRS South Africa, refer to www.grassrootsoccer.org.

    For other vacancies in the NGO sector, refer to www.ngopulse.org/vacancies.

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  • Saide: Digital Story Publishing Coordinator

    South African Institute for Distance Education (Saide)
    Please note: this opportunity closing date has passed and may not be available any more.
    Opportunity closing date: 
    Sunday, September 15, 2013
    Opportunity type: 
    Employment
    The South African Institute for Distance Education's (Saide) recently established, innovative African Storybook Project aims to support early literacy development through creating and stimulating the use of a website and digital library of openly licensed local language stories for the first few years of reading. Founded in 1992 as an educational Trust, Saide strives to increase access to quality cost-effective education through the use of open learning approaches, quality distance education strategies, and appropriate technology in South Africa and the African region.

    Saide seeks to appoint a Digital Story Publishing Coordinator, based in Braamfontein, Johannesburg.

    Duration: 2013 to 2016

    This is a full-time contract position until December 2016

    The successful candidate will oversee a process of digitally publishing a critical mass of stories in local languages for early reading acquired from three pilot countries (Kenya, Uganda and South Africa) and elsewhere.

    Requirements:
    • Passion for and knowledge of African children’s literature for the early years, including emergent literacy;
    • Ability to write, version and translate stories for children;
    • Knowledge and experience of publishing on the web;
    • Ability to manage a digital publishing process, with a good design sense and attention to detail;
    • Commitment to professional learning, particularly in alternative publishing models and open licensing;
    • English communication skills, both oral and written;
    • Knowledge of one or more African languages, particularly those from the pilot countries;
    • At least an Honours level qualification in a relevant area.
    Remuneration will be commensurate with skills and experience.

    To apply, submit a written one-page motivation, CV and the names and contact details of three work-related referees to Maureen Madonsela at aspvacancies@saide.org.za.

    Please quote the source of this advertisement in your application - NGO Pulse Portal.

    Enquiries: Tel, 011 403 2813

    More comprehensive project and position descriptions are available on the website.

    For more about the South African Institute for Distance Education, refer to www.saide.org.za.

    For other vacancies in the NGO sector, refer to www.ngopulse.org/vacancies.

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    Want to reach the widest spectrum of NGO and development stakeholders in South Africa as part of your communication and outreach objectives? Learn more about how the NGO Pulse Premium Advertising Service can support your communication requirements. Visit http://goo.gl/MUCvL for more information.
  • Grassroot Soccer: Site Coordinator - Port Elizabeth

    Grassroot Soccer South Africa
    Please note: this opportunity closing date has passed and may not be available any more.
    Opportunity closing date: 
    Wednesday, November 6, 2013
    Opportunity type: 
    Employment
    Grassroot Soccer (GRS) is a South African nonprofit organisation that uses the power of soccer to prevent HIV/AIDS. GRS trains local community-based youth role models as skills coaches to deliver comprehensive HIV prevention and life skills education through rigorously designed and evidence based curricula.
    Since that time, GRS has evolved into one of the leading sport for development public health NGOs. The organization’s global headquarters are in Norwich, VT with African headquarters in Cape Town, South Africa and additional offices in Zambia, Zimbabwe, and London.  The GRS team currently encompasses over 170 full time team members in five countries on three continents, as well as over 500 coaches in South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe. 

    GRC seeks to appoint a Site Coordinator, based in Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape.

    This is an opportunity for an exceptional person to join the team at Grassroot Soccer in Port Elizabeth, South Africa.

    Above all the Site Coordinator drives the vision of GRS in Port Elizabeth, ensuring a deliberate, focused and effective delivery of what we do!  The Site Coordinator is essentially responsible for all program delivery, activities and leadership with support of six staff, two interns and 41 coaches.  The SC is the primary custodian of the site budget and must ensure careful planning of all activities according to the annual workplan. The SC ensures that intervention targets are met while allocated site funds are being spent according to grant agreements and as per the financial regulations of GRS.  They ensure that all monthly reports are accurate, and are completed on time and to exceptional standard.  Finally the SC is responsible for forging and maintaining local partnerships and stakeholder relationships in order to promote local business development, support programme delivery and maintain and develop referral networks to provide referral services.

    GRS is where it is today through what we believe is a pretty rare mix of very clear mission, passion, humility, and a singular focus on quantifiable outcomes. As such, we’ve built a hard-earned and proud reputation among the global funding community as one of the few NGOs for whom “return on investment” is a given, and we don’t take that reputation lightly. Continual innovation is at the core of who we are and we’re not afraid to lead from the front.  GRS isn’t for everyone, and a ‘fit’ with our culture is a must. You must have contagious positive energy, a passion for our mission, be self-motivated and demonstrate incredible teamwork.  We’re an organization comprised of refreshingly sharp, confident and committed individuals who truly thrive on the strength of the combined team – the whole at GRS is a great deal more than the sum of the parts. A Bachelor’s degree is preferred and you have proven experience in leading a team to strength and expertly managing finances. The Site Coordinator will both thrive in, and make an enormous contribution to our unique and very special organization.

    Only exceptional candidates need to apply. 

    To apply, submit a CV and motivation letter stating how you can make an extraordinary contribution to the organisation to hrsa@grassrootsoccer.org.

    Please quote the source of this advertisement in your application - NGO Pulse Portal.

    We reserve the right not to make an appointment.

    For more about GRS South Africa, refer to www.grassrootsoccer.org.

    For other vacancies in the NGO sector, refer to www.ngopulse.org/vacancies.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Want to reach the widest spectrum of NGO and development stakeholders in South Africa as part of your communication and outreach objectives? Learn more about how the NGO Pulse Premium Advertising Service can support your communication requirements. Visit http://goo.gl/MUCvL for more information.
  • Symphonia: Finance Manager

    Symphonia for South Africa
    Please note: this opportunity closing date has passed and may not be available any more.
    Opportunity closing date: 
    Monday, July 15, 2013
    Opportunity type: 
    Employment
    Symphonia is a nonprofit organisational change practice that works with leaders to engage their stakeholders so that talent, human energy and creativity is maximised. Our mission is to ignite a sense of possibility everywhere we work.

    Symphonia for South Africa seeks to appoint a Finance Manager, based in Cape Town.

    The person will provide support to the organisation’s management in terms of strategic and analytical financial management, and overall management of the day to day finance function for both the non-profit, as well as the for-profit company.

    Reporting to the Executive and the Board, the candidate will set the financial strategy through planning and active leadership within the financial arena, and provide proactive financial support to the Programme Managers, so that the organisation can develop further into the future, following a social enterprise model.
     
    This role is responsible for handling the external and internal audits, as well as all donor and management financial reporting, and contributes toward grant proposals and for the full accounting function including budgeting, payroll, compliance and governance matters. Control of all financial procedures and systems, and previous supervision of bookkeeping staff is essential, as is the requirement of a C.A. or similar qualification. It is also a very strong preference that you will have gained experience within a complex nonprofit environment.
     
    Responsibilities:

    This role is seen as critical to the success of the Symphonia group of companies and the incumbent will therefore be expected to play an active role as a member of the Symphonia team.
    • Cash flow management – annual and weekly;
    • Office administration pertaining to financial affairs;
    • Accurate data capturing of all financial information;
    • Basic accounting processing up to trial balance;
    • Weekly dashboard-style management account for operational management;
    • Monthly management accounts for the Board;
    • Prepare audit processes annually and liaise with auditors
    • Oversee payroll and PAYE coordination
    • Attend to all statuary administration with regards to SARS and other legal requirements;
    • Manage debtors and creditors;
    • Create budgets for managing and decision making;
    • Any ad-hoc related activities or tasks as requested by Management.
    Requirements:
    • University degree with accounting as a major as well as a number of years of experience in management level and board reporting;
    • Experience in implementing and checking internal controls;
    • Communication at various levels will be key;
    • Strong English writing skills, with an ability to translate what the numbers are saying;
    • Experience in a nonprofit organisations is helpful, but not essential;
    • Passion for the sector and an enjoyment gained in working with people from all backgrounds;
    • Working hours are negotiable. A salary commensurate with experience will be offered, the current funding for this position does not allow for the payment of company benefits.
    Due to funding constraints, flexible hours or part-time employment may be considered.
     
    To apply, submit a CV (maximum three pages) and motivation letter to amanda@symphonia.net

    Please quote the source of this advertisement in your application - NGO Pulse Portal.

    Only short listed candidates will be contacted.

    For more about Symphonia for South Africa, refer to www.symphonia.net.

    For other vacancies in the NGO sector, refer to www.ngopulse.org/vacancies.

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  • Limpopo-based NPO Develops Winning Formula for Youth Empowerment

    Keep The Dream196 (KTD196), a not-for-profit life skills project located near Tzaneen, Limpopo, is becoming known for its positive and lasting impact on orphans and vulnerable children.

    Since its inception in 2007, the organisation has been assisting local children and the youth to overcome the difficult life obstacles they face on a daily basis, through building resilience physically, emotionally, spiritually and psychologically. The goal is to help them realise their full potential and contribute to the building of South Africa.

    “As a child focused, rights-based organisation we do not believe in quick fixes when it comes to addressing the needs of children. Instead we help them to develop the skills they need to handle challenges throughout life, and I believe that is the secret to our success” explains founder and director of KTD196, Louise Batty.

    KTD196 offers a comprehensive, integrated model of training, care and support for all children in the area, and particularly for orphans and vulnerable children and their caregivers. One of the most popular programmes that KTD196 runs is based on the scouts programme. Their emphasis is on the scout laws and promise to ‘do your best and help others at all times’, with a strong focus on morals and values. By all accounts, not only has the scout programme proven to be effective in preparing local youngsters to make appropriate ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes, but  it is also helping build self-confidence and the knowledge and skills that can help them be more successful and productive citizens.

    Positive Results

    Other programmes offered by KTD196 include communication skills with children, group therapy, developing circles of support, children's rights and responsibilities, leadership skills and a lot more. These programmes and training appear to have been very effective in addressing challenges and issues that impact the youth in the area. For instance, the level of teenage pregnancy among girls involved in their programmes is but a fraction of provincial norms, while the level of education has greatly improved in a sense that more children from the area are passing their matric and also enrolling in tertiary institutions, unlike before.

    It appears that the relationship between parents and their participating children has also improved. “Before my child joined KTD196 he was always out late at night and being a bully. I always thought he was going to turn out like most youngsters who have given up on their dreams and are wasting their lives away. Since joining KTD196 he no longer drinks and his behaviour has also changed. I ‘ve also learned to communicate with my child and not yell at him,” explains one parent, Maite Mametja.

    Accessing study loans or a bursary is among the many other challenges that most youth in rural areas face. Although Lephane is among those areas impacted by this challenge, the situation has greatly improved due to the career guidance and access to study loans or bursary programmes conducted at KTD196. All this indicates significant progress that the youth in Lephane are making.

    While studies show that 70 percent of students from rural backgrounds fail to cope or even complete their studies due to drugs and alcohol, lack of financial or parental support and other challenges, Batty proudly notes that this has not been the case with the kids at KTD196. “All our kids have managed to stay in school and they have been performing well, in fact most of them are well on the way to completing their studies,” she adds.

    NPO Sector Facing Challenges

    Despite the good work that KTD196 does, Batty points that it is never easy to run an organisation like KTD196, especially since the services and programmes are mostly provided free of charge. She says that accessing funding and getting support is a huge challenge to the organisation. Like many nonprofit organisations, KTD196 also struggles with inadequate facilities, lack of volunteers and the challenge of finding and retaining qualified staff.

    “We are developmental by nature so people are our focus; we have minimal overheads apart from salaries to do this important work. We work with people who are unemployed with minimal skills, and strive to empower them to impact their own children and communities,” explains Batty.

    Batty says many local adults want to work with them, but only if they get permanent work or are paid.  She is striving to encourage people to volunteer at KTD196 without expectation of getting rewards in return, at least in the short-term. “The reward we will all reap is a better future for our country,” she concludes.

    To learn more about the work of Keep The Dream 196 or to offer support, contact Louise Batty on keepthedream196@gmail.com.

    - Abram Molelemane is a third year journalism student at the Tshwane University of Technology. He has written for various publications such as Wealthwise magazine and Reckord newspaper. In 2011, he was nominated for the Reckord print journalist of the year award. He is currently a media officer at Fetola.
    Author(s): 
    Abram Molelemane
  • Has the Door Opened for South Africa’s Youth?

    The first Freedom Day, in 1994, marked a departure from 300 years of colonialism and official segregation in South Africa, and promised a future where the gulf between rich and poor would be no more. Today, this promise still exists but its star has faded somewhat. 19 years of democracy has yielded little change in the living conditions of millions of South Africans, and for many this star has all but disappeared.

    Born in 1990, a few months after Nelson Mandela’s release from prison, I grew up in a world sans apartheid. The scars of this past, however, were still present in South Africa’s social fabric. Despite the end of official segregation, my experience of post-apartheid South Africa still had an electric racial charge. Communities remained segregated, political dialogue was severely polarised, and the adage of the railway tracks was still a case of black and white.

    As a young person in South Africa, my experience and prospects have taken their own special shape. Unemployment has been a burden for most South Africans, but has been particularly acute for the youth. Since 1994, South Africa’s youth unemployment has ranged between 45 and 58 percent and, according to the 2012 Labour Force Survey, is currently at the unacceptably high rate of 51 percent. In reality, more than half of the people who are expected to guide South Africa’s future do not have a stake in its presence.

    Last year, I was destined to join the labour force as one of these ill-favoured youths, and with full knowledge of the mass of disillusioned young people that I was competing with - this appeared a daunting prospect. Nonetheless, I was armed with an Honours Degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics and was confident that my academic qualifications would see me surge to the top of the pool of prospective employees. Several lukewarm responses from employers later, and my hopes were brought back down-to-earth.

    The explanation for this poor reception rested in one line that marred my chances with most employers: ‘no work experience’. The Catch-22 of ‘you cannot get work experience without work experience’ became a dismal reality for me. I eventually emerged from the job-searching doldrums when I received some positive feedback from a small but growing Enterprise Development firm based in Westlake, called Fetola. In January of this year, I was employed there as a business intern.

    After a few weeks of working at Fetola it became apparent that there was just cause for most firms’ reluctance to hire graduates; namely that we lack workplace skills. As a business graduate, I was fortunate enough to be proficient in various computer programmes and could add value in this area; however, this is not the case with many other graduates, who do not learn these skills during their studying period.  These skills deficiencies, as well as poor communication and presentation skills, make it difficult for many graduates to provide real and productive value to their employers. Consequently, this fuels the growing stigma towards graduates as being under-prepared for the realities of working life.

    For a graduate, the first weeks of work are a baptism of fire. One is confronted with responsibilities that can make a tangible change in the real world; failure to manage these responsibilities can have ripple effects that extend far beyond the confines of a report card. This is far removed from the world of malleable essay deadlines that graduates are used to. In short, work experience is where real-world learning takes place. Working at Fetola has taught me the value of effective communication and administrative skills, as well as a work ethic that formal education could seldom instil. This kind of experience is essential for graduates to succeed in the business world.

    My experience in the workplace has also provided another lesson. Fetola runs a number of programmes that provide small medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) with business support and help them achieve business success. Its mandate and vision are therefore very closely aligned with the economic success of South African citizens. The programmes generally give preference to firms that are black-owned or that have a high proportion of employees that are black, however, the barriers to entry are high and there are no free rides. In this way, Fetola seeks to contribute to redressing the inequities of the past, but in a manner that is positive; it is about working towards a future in which all South Africans are successful rather than dwelling on past injustices. This is exemplified in the office environment and the spirit of the organisation. The workplace itself is extremely integrated, and among the employees the concept of colour feels washed away. Fetola thus resembles a microcosm of my vision of a future South Africa, one that is conscious of a turbulent past and acknowledges the need for redress, but for which positive action is not hamstrung by legacy and a sense of entitlement; a future that is about growth and not about politics.

    The political discourse of 2013 suggests that South Africa may be adjusting its trajectory towards achieving such a future. In his 2013 State of the Nation Address, President Jacob Zuma alluded to a youth wage incentive scheme and a shift in focus towards getting the youth working. Furthermore, the National Development Plan, produced by the National Planning Commission, proposes to eliminate the ‘skills gap’ between what young people have learnt and what is demanded by the economy. At Fetola, we are busy with the development of the Graduate Asset Programme (GAP), an initiative to place 24 000 graduates into internships over the next three years, thereby boosting the small business sector with skills and also giving capable graduates much-needed access to real work experience. The overwhelming response to GAP thus far has proven without doubt that private and public interests alike are enthusiastic about putting our youth to work.

    This political dialogue suggests that the star of South Africa’s promise may once again brighten for the youth. With Youth Day approaching, the youth have cause to look back to 1994 and revive the promise of the future. This hope must be tempered by an awareness that we need to deliver on these promises, but by up-skilling our youth and by pointing ourselves towards growth and away from a racially embittered past, we can unlock South Africa’s potential.

    Nicholas Owsley is an Assistant Project Manager at Fetola. He recently graduated with an Honours Degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics and has been publishing in the Sowetan, Engineering News, Business Report, and others.
    Author(s): 
    Nicholas Owsley
  • Youth Wage Subsidy May Work

    Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) says that South Africa could do better with a youth wage subsidy than without.

    Stats SA statistician general, Pali Lehohla, points out that there is a problem of skills, experience and of getting into the system in the country.

    Lehohla is of the view that the youth wage subsidy reduces salaries from those that are working and so on, adding that, “ But I think if one looks at the net end to society, I suspect a with-youth-wage-subsidy-environment is a much better option for South Africa in the long-term than a without-subsidy-environment."

    To read the article titled, “Lehohla: Youth wage subsidy may work,” click here.

    Source: 
    Fin24
  • The Importance of HR Management in an NGO Environment

    The importance of Human Resources (HR) in a non-governmental organisation (NGO) as a means of ensuring sustainable growth for an organisation cannot be overemphasised, as it is the fundamental strength upon which people, strategies, processes and operations are based. Effective employee management should be on top of the list of priorities for progressive improvement of an organisation. A NGO must strive to attract, develop and retain qualified and enthusiastic employees as they are the key to the success of one’s business. HR in a NGO is no different to HR in any other sector, but the problems that HR professionals face within the NGO industry are quite unique.
     
    There are two main problems concerning HR in the NGO environment today:

    • The first is the high unemployment rate which causes an exceptionally high number of under qualified job seekers to stream into the childcare environment, the reason for this can also be attributed to an industry that does not have the competitive advantage when it comes to salary benchmarking. This leads to shortages of qualified skilled childcare workers in the industry; and
    • The second is retaining highly skilled and qualified people and keeping them motivated. Learning and development are central to both the performance and development of employees. It can be beneficial for an organisation to offer employees equal and full access to learning and development opportunities that are aligned to their career development, as well as the skills and competencies required to meet business performance and growth objectives.
    Abraham Kriel Childcare is continuously developing and training their childcare workers to deliver high standard childcare services.  Interventions such as this help employees to feel valued. NGOs have an ever increasing need to attract the right people in the right positions in a constantly evolving environment.

    Heads of NGOs and those long associated with the development sector will confirm that the supply of well qualified people, prepared to make the necessary sacrifices in respect of remuneration, for the sake of the cause, has diminished rapidly in the last 18 years or so. Job opportunities for today’s educated youth are more widespread. This has made a career in development less attractive to people in the age group from which the sector drew its strengths from in the 1970s and 1980s. The days when NGOs were driven by social activists are no longer. NGOs now have a high demand for skilled employees to help the organisation function at its best.

    In the case of a NGO that works with children or vulnerable people, it is of utmost importance to implement a vetting system that screens all new appointees.
     
    Applicable screenings would be:
    • The child protection register;
    • Qualifications,
    • Criminal record; and
    • Identity and professional registration.
    Almost all the HR practices are being adapted by larger NGOs and the roles and responsibilities are equally challenging. Clear selection criteria must be created. A NGO should take advantage of the benefits of tools like psychometric testing in the selection process. Psychometric testing and other similar tools can contribute significant value by helping HR practitioners in placing the right types of individuals in the right positions. This also helps to ensure that new employees receive the correct training to enhance their own skills, specifically in critical positions such as childcare and management roles.

    Providing employees with support and understanding is especially important in organisations that work with children and trauma cases. An example is that of a wellness initiative that focuses on the well-being of staff, including, health, trauma and employee stress. Such initiatives are aimed at retaining qualified, enthusiastic employees and developing a positive organisational culture. It is critical for HR practitioners to partner with businesses in understanding the needs of an organisation. As well as what challenges the industry is facing, skills shortages, salary disparities, best practice HR procedures and government policies that stands as a hindrance to the success of a NGO.
     
    The personnel function in the NGO industry has evolved to the HR business partnering concept and is well embraced by many NGOs in recent years. Any NGO using the business partnering model with strategic intent in aligning people to business is bound to achieve organisational success. The NGO world is continuously evolving and is becoming an industry to be recognised as the change frontier in economic and social development in the country and with the right people it’s bound to achieve success.    

    - Portia Sokkie is human resource manager at Abraham Kriel Childcare. For more about Abraham Kriel Childcare, refer to www.abrahamkriel.org or www.abrahamkriel.tumblr.com.

    Author(s): 
    Portia Sokkie
  • Symphonia for South Africa: Internship

    Symphonia for South Africa
    Please note: this opportunity closing date has passed and may not be available any more.
    Opportunity closing date: 
    Friday, March 15, 2013
    Opportunity type: 
    Employment
    Symphonia is a nonprofit organisational change practice that works with leaders to engage their stakeholders so that talent, human energy and creativity is maximised. Our mission is to ignite a sense of possibility everywhere we work.

    Symphonia for South Africa seeks to appoint an Intern, based in Cape Town.

    The person is expected to have writing experience, excellent verbal and written communication skills, ability to meet deadlines and work under pressure. Knowledge of social media marketing will be an advantage.

    The successful candidate must be available to commence employment on 1 April 1013.

    Enquiries: Write and request the application form to winslow@symphonia.net.

    Please quote the source of this advertisement in your application - NGO Pulse Portal.

    For more about Symphonia for South Africa, refer to www.symphonia.net.

    For other vacancies in the NGO sector, refer to www.ngopulse.org/vacancies..

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  • Symphonia for South Africa: Accountant / Financial Controller

    Symphonia for South Africa
    Please note: this opportunity closing date has passed and may not be available any more.
    Opportunity closing date: 
    Monday, February 25, 2013
    Opportunity type: 
    Employment
    Symphonia is a nonprofit organisational change practice that works with leaders to engage their stakeholders so that talent, human energy and creativity is maximised. Our mission is to ignite a sense of possibility everywhere we work.

    Symphonia  for South Africa seeks to appoint an Accountant/Financial Controller with a heart from social development. This position is based in Cape Town.

    This is a unique opportunity to make a real contribution to education in South Africa. Partner for Possibility, one of the initiatives, is a ground breaking project that is already impacting 40 000 children after only two years. Symphonia is currently working with 90 principles in a leadership development program. The potential of this position is to be a part of taking this work to the next level and making a difference for 2000 schools in the next 10 years.

    This person needs to be experienced at running the systems and processes required to ensure that all the financial administration is accurate and up to date.  Fundamental to the role is a keen sense of financial control.  The position involves end-to-end responsibility from transactional capturing through bank reconciliation and eventually weekly management accounts.  The role will work closely with a part-time CFO to develop streamlined systems to optimise the data and information flow from transaction to dashboard-style reporting.  The businesses rely heavily on a profit-centre style accounting so that reporting must drill-down to that level.  An attention to detail approach is important and the ability to work in a dynamic and exciting environment as a large portion involves a virtual national environment.

    Responsibilities:
    • Cash flow management – annual and weekly;
    • Depth knowledge of Pastell and Excel is crucial;
    • Accurate data capturing of all financial information;
    • Weekly dashboard-style managements account for operational management;
    • Monthly management accounts for the Board;
    • Prepare audit processes annually and liaise with auditors;
    • Oversee payroll and PAYE coordination;
    • Attend to all statuary administration with regard to SARS and other legal requirements;
    • Manage debtors and creditors;
    • Create budgets for managing and decision making.
    Requirements:
    • Relevant tertiary education qualification, finance related with financial experience; 
    • Sound financial insight as to correct allocations of particular transactions is a non-negotiable requirements as is a strong attention to detail foundation;
    • Ability to work comfortably and effectively in a virtual environment;
    • High EQ and is able to deal with ambiguity and complexity;  
    • Ability to stay calm when things get busy and to hold clear boundaries;
    • Capable using computers and technologies that enable virtual working;
    • Have a “can do” attitude and believes that things are possible and can be worked out;
    • Good track record of volunteering.
    To apply, submit a CV and motivation letter to Louis@louisvanniekerk.com.  

    Please quote the source of this advertisement in your application - NGO Pulse Portal.

    Candidates who do not hear back from Symphonia for South Africa should consider their application unsuccessful.

    For more about Symphonia for South Africa, refer to www.symphonia.net.

    For other vacancies in the NGO sector, refer to www.ngopulse.org/vacancies..

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