prevention

Zimbabwe Monitors Ebola at Borders

Zimbabwe has started setting up health ports to strictly monitor visitors coming in via air or land routes and will quarantine them if necessary in a bid to curb a possible Ebola outbreak.
 
This, despite confirmation from Zimbabwe’s director of epidemiology in the Ministry of Health and Child Care, Portia Manangazira, that no Ebola cases had been detected in that country.

Mozambique Acts Against Ebola

Mozambican health authorities draw up a questionnaire that will be asked to all passengers who have come from, or passed through, the West African countries where Ebola has been reported in an attempt to ensure that the deadly disease Ebola does not reach the country.

The health ministry says the measures will be implemented at all the country's international airport, ports and land borders, in addition, anyone from the affected areas who presents possible Ebola symptoms (such as fever, severe weakness and muscular, head and throat pains) will also be questioned.

Malaria a Threat to Southern Africa

Advocacy groups believe that greater regional cooperation is needed to eliminate malaria as it remains a health threat to millions of people living in Southern Africa.

Roll Back Malaria, a partnership of organisations, says 200 000 people continue to die from the disease in Southern African each year, with the occurrence remaining unacceptably high in the region.

Malawi’s AIDS Mechanisms Blamed

Malawi’s Department of Nutrition and HIV/AIDS in the Office of the President and Cabinet’s principal secretary, Edith Mkawa, blames the mechanisms utilised to dispatch messages of HIV/AIDS in the early 1990s as a contributing factor to the increased transmission of the virus in that country.

Mkawa has been quoted as saying that attributes that people in the country do not fully understand the concepts of HIV and AIDS because of traditional norms which influenced the spread of the disease.

Tlou Honoured for Humanitarian Work

Director of UNAIDS regional support team for eastern and Southern Africa, Professor Sheila Tlou, says she is honoured to be awarded with the honorary Doctor of Humane Letters by the University of Botswana.
 
Tlou, who received the Non Academic Services Champion award for her outstanding work, says her 28 years of experience has taught her to put other people before herself.
 
She adds that when she became Botswana's Health Minister in 2004, she saved many lives despite criticism from western countries.
 

NGO Criticises ANC Over Condoms

The Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) has criticised the African National Congress (ANC) for what it says is the party's non-commitment to making condoms available at schools.

In a press statement, the TAC argues that condoms should be made available at all schools in order to address South Africa's high HIV infection rate among teenagers.
However, its election survey of HIV shows that the ruling ANC is not committed to doing so.

HEAIDS Welcomes Flavoured Condoms

The Higher Education and Training HIV/AIDS Programme (HEAIDS) has welcomed the idea of giving colourful and flavoured condoms to tertiary institutions.

HEAIDS director, Ramneek Ahluwalia, points out that encouraging condom use among tertiary students is a good place to start, since many students join the higher education and training facilities from the age of 15.

The comments follow a report by the Human Sciences Research Council, which highlights that it is between the ages of 15 to 24 where the youth is most at risk of acquiring HIV.

SA Tops in New HIV Infections

The Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) says the proportion of South Africans infected with HIV has increased from 10.6 percent in 2008 to 12.2 percent in 2012.

According to the HSRC’s National HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Behaviour Survey, the total number of infected South Africans now stands at 6.4 million; 1.2 million more than in 2008.

It says women aged between 30 and 34 and males aged 35 to 39 have the highest infection rates: 36 percent of females and 28.8 percent of males in these respective age groups contracted HIV.

Progress in the Fight Against HIV

A new study by Doctors Without Borders (MSF) has revealed that while KwaZulu-Natal remains the focal point of the HIV epidemic in South Africa, progress is being made on early diagnosis, intervention and treatment.

MSF is also commending government interventions on treatment in Eshowe and Mbongolwane in northern KwaZulu-Natal, saying that early diagnosis and administration of antiretroviral therapy are bearing fruit.

Pages

NGO Services

NGO Services

NGO Events

S M T W T F S
 
 
 
 
4
 
 
6
 
7
 
 
 
 
11
 
 
 
14
 
 
 
 
 
 
20
 
21
 
 
 
24
 
 
26
 
27
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Subscribe to RSS - prevention