politics

politics

  • Corruption Hinders MDGs - CIVICUS

    CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen Participation has warned that Africa will not be able to realise the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) because of corruption.
     
    CIVICUS head of policy and research, Mandeep Tiwana, points out that the MDGs are eight time-bound goals which provide concrete, numerical benchmarks for tackling extreme poverty in its many dimensions.
     
    Tiwana states that these includes targets on income poverty, hunger, maternal and child mortality, disease, inadequate shelter, gender inequality, environmental degradation and the Global Partnership for Development.
     
    He further says inequalities are not an African problem but it is a global problem, adding that these are some of the serious issues our leaders need to address.
     
    To read article titled, “Corruption seen as hindrance to MDGs in Africa,” click here.

    Source: 
    SABC News
  • Africa Urged to Move Towards Afro-Realism

    As the continent progresses in key areas, Mo Ibrahim, philanthropist and founder of Mo Ibrahim Foundation, says we need to move decisively away from both Afro-optimistic and Afro-pessimistic headlines.
     
    The Foundation published the ‘2013 Ibrahim Index of African Governance’, an index which tells us that the outlook is mixed and that neither Afro-pessimism nor Afro-optimism does justice to modern Africa.
     
    An honest assessment of the continent as supported by the index reveals that governance trends in Africa are both complex and diverse. It further notes that Africa's many achievements, but it should also include a pragmatic acknowledgement of the distance Africa has to go.
     
    To read the article titled “Africa needs to move towards Afro-realism,” click here.

    Source: 
    Mail and Guardian
  • Gigaba Criticises Opposition Parties, NGOs

    African National Congress (ANC) national executive committee member and Minister of Public Enterprises, Malusi Gigaba, has criticised opposition parties and non-governmental organisations for telling foreign countries that South Africa has failed since democracy.

    Gigaba told the South African Democratic Teachers' Union (SADTU) that, "All around us, the opportunists, the pessimists, the opposition and the counter-revolutionists are telling us what we have achieved in the last 19 years has been nothing and this revolution faces its inevitable doom."

    He further states that some opposition leaders have went to countries like the United States and spoke ill of development in South Africa in aims of getting money from them.

    To read article titled, “Gigaba criticises doomsayers,” click here.

    Source: 
    SABC News
  • OUTA Abandons e-Toll Court Battle

    The Opposition to Urban Tolling Alliance (OUTA) says it will not appeal the Supreme Court of Appeal's dismissal of its challenge to e-tolls.
     
    OUTA chairperson, Wayne Duvenage, states that the organisation will not appeal the judgment as it is constrained by lack of funding.
     
    Duvenage notes that to appeal, OUTA will need R3.3 million and can no longer afford to appeal, adding that despite that, the organisation will never stop denouncing the e-tolls.
     
    To read article titled “OUTA abandons e-toll court fight” click here.

    Source: 
    IOL News
  • NGOs Forced to Work With ZANU-PF

    The Community Tolerance Reconciliation and Development (COTRAD) says that ZANU-PF uses memoranda's of understanding to ensure that non-governmental organisations (NGOs) do not have total autonomy when implementing programmes.

    COTRAD programmes manager at advocacy group, Zivanai Muzorodzi, says that while NGOs want to conduct their activities impartially, his experiences in the Masvingo Province have shown that this is not always possible.

    Muzorodzi explains that, "Every organisation that wants to implement a programme in the community is made to sign a memorandum of understanding,” argues that this is a trick that ZANU-PF uses to ensure that all NGOs follow lines of communication crafted by the party.

    To read the article titled, “NGOs forced to work with ZANU-PF structures,” click here.

    Source: 
    All Africa
  • Parliament Slams Reaction to e-Tolls

    Parliament's transport portfolio committee on transport says Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU) and Opposition to Urban Tolling Alliance’s (OUTA) call for motorists not to pay for e-tolls in Gauteng defies the Constitution.
     
    The committee has urged both e-tolling critics to demonstrate their respect for the law by accepting the decision made by the courts.
     
    "The committee is concerned that these two organisations are encouraging citizens not to abide by an Act of Parliament and thus defy the Constitution of the country," states Ruth Bhengu, committee chairperson.
     
    To read the article titled, “Parliamentary committee condemns Outa, COSATU's e-tolls reaction”, click here.

    Source: 
    Mail and Guardian
  • Hlophe, Mdluli Cases Highlight Trend of Cover-Ups - FUL

    Freedom Under Law (FUL) says the cases of former crime intelligence head General Richard Mdluli and Western Cape Judge President John Hlophe, though unrelated, have highlighted what it calls “a disturbing trend of cover ups”.
     
    FUL's former Constitutional Court Judge, Johan Kriegler, says both cases relate to very senior people in very responsible positions being involved in allegations of very serious misconduct.
     
    “Those charges are then withdrawn against them for reasons that appear to an outsider just weird, inexplicable. We in FUL said these look odd. This cannot be right. We are entitled to know what happened.” - FUL.
     
    To read the article titled ‘Hlophe, Mdluli cases highlight trend of cover-ups: FUL’, click here.

    Source: 
    SABC News
  • Angolan Refugees Return From DRC

    The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) says that tens of thousands of Angolans living in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) are set to return home, for some after more than 50 years in exile.

    UNHCR spokesperson, Celine Schmitt, points out that a first group of 500 people left Kinshasa by train and are expected to stay overnight at a transit centre in Kimpese in the southeast on the way to the border.

    Schmitt, who says the rest of the journey will take place by bus, adds that about 48 000 Angolans are estimated to live in the DRC, and some 18 000 of them wish to remain.

    To read the article titled, “Angolan refugees return from DRC,” click here.

    Source: 
    News 24
  • Lacking Political Will Compromises Strong Constitutional Frameworks

    Gender equality and women’s rights are guaranteed in most Southern African constitutions but these do not result in substantive equality for women. Among other struggles, women remain unequal, under-represented at all levels of decision-making and experience high levels of gender based violence (GBV). These conditions obstruct women from realising their human rights.
     
    On paper, all countries in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) have strong provisions on gender equality and equity. In addition, 13 countries, except Mauritius and Botswana have signed and ratified the SADC Gender Protocol (SGP), and are in the process of domesticating the provisions. SADC countries have also committed to other continental and global instruments promoting human and women’s rights. These include the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW 1979), the African Union Protocol on the Rights of Women in Africa, the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (1995) and the United Nations Millennium Declaration (2000) that spells out the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).
     
    In practice however, these instruments and their clauses are compromised by a lack of political will, slow implementation of key pieces of legislation that promote gender equality, and flagrant abuses of human and women’s rights.
     
    As South Africans observe national Women’s Day on 9 August 2014 the Women Empowerment and Gender Equality (WEGE) Bill that aims to give effect to gender equality provisions in the Constitution is currently on hold. WEGE’s key provisions address the “social development’ of women, via education and training aimed at eradicating gender-based discrimination and violence and increasing education around access to healthcare. The other key focus area is equal representation and empowerment of women through the progressive realisation of a minimum of 50 percent representation and ‘meaningful participation’ of women in public and private decision-making structures, including businesses and political parties. There are specific provisions that address the socio-economic empowerment of rural women and women with disabilities.
     
    Recent developments on the WEGE are of concern. The Bill has been referred back to Parliament from the National Council of Provinces (NCOP). The NCOP asked how the Bill was linked to other legislation meant to address women empowerment as previous legislation had failed on that objective. What then, was the guarantee that the Bill would be effective?
     
    The 2014 Human Rights Watch World Report highlights concerns about human rights abuses in Angola that contradict the provisions in the Constitution as well as other human rights commitments made by the country.
     
    In early April 2014, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Navi Pillay, visited Angola at the invitation of the government. During her visit, Pillay raised a wide array of human rights concerns, including media restrictions and freedom of expression; the state’s use of excessive force to repress protests; mistreatment and sexual violence against migrants; forced evictions; and violations of economic and social rights. Pillay’s visit shone a spotlight on Angola’s human rights record, which is mostly ignored by regional and international partners in favour of strengthening trade links.
     
    Another key challenge in most SADC countries are the contradictions emerging from dual legal systems either through the formal recognition of customary law or common practice. As a result women are treated as minors and do not enjoy the rights guaranteed in the countries’ constitutions. Muna Ndulo, professor of law and director of the Cornell University's Institute for African Development, also chairperson of the board of Gender Links, discusses the impact of dual legal systems in the Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies.
     
    The sources of law in most African countries are customary law, the common law and legislation (both colonial and post-independence). In a typical African country, the great majority of the people conduct their personal activities in accordance with and subject to customary law, which has a great impact on matters such as marriage, inheritance and traditional authority. Customary laws were developed in an era dominated by patriarchy, some of its norms conflict with human rights norms that guarantee equality between men and women.
     
    While recognising the role of legislation in reform, it is argued that the courts have an important role to play in ensuring that customary laws are reviewed and developed to ensure that they conform to human rights law and contribute to the promotion of equality between men and women. The guiding principle should be that customary law is living law and therefore cannot be static and must account for the changing lived experiences of the people it aims to serve.
     
    Ndulo states that many constitutions recognise the application of customary law without resolving its conflict with human rights provisions. He uses the Zambia Constitution as an example to illustrate ‘claw back’ clauses that qualify and compromise constitutional provisions on equality and non-discrimination.
     
    The new Tanzania Constitution is proposing far reaching changes including press freedom; the public's right to access information; education for all; greater representation for women in politics; and the adoption of a federal system of government.
     
    The draft guarantees women 50 percent representation in Parliament, an increase from the current 30 percent quota. At present, women parliamentarians are appointed to special seats by parties. Under the proposed Constitution, political parties would lose the power to nominate women to parliamentary seats and instead, voters in every province would elect two parliamentarians, of who one has to be a woman.
     
    Moving forward all SADC countries must make constitutions living documents that change women’s lived reality and ensure equal rights for women.
     
    - Kubi Rama is the Deputy Chief Executive Officer of Gender Links. This article is part of the Gender Links News Service special series on Women’s Month.
    Author(s): 
    Kubi Rama
  • Learners Cause Chaos in Jo’burg CBD

    Learners who trashed the Johannesburg City Centre during a protest blame supporters of the Economic Freedom Fighters for the scuffle with vendors and shop owners. 

    The march led by the Congress of South Students (COSAS) deteriorated after their memorandum of grievances relating to improvement of school conditions was handed over to the Gauteng Education MEC, Panyaza Lesufi.

    COSAS president general, Collin Malatji, says they are not certain if the four learners who were taken to hospital were their members, despite the organisation being known for such behaviour in the past.

    To read the article titled, “COSAS causes havoc in Joburg CBD,” click here.

    Source: 
    SABC News
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