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NDA

NDA

  • Thinking Is Overrated...

    In the past few weeks, there has been yet another huge public outcry on the functioning of the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund (NLDTF) and this has provoked a range of talk (and a lot of hot air too) about how we can go about fixing things to make one of the larger national development funders in South Africa, work better. This talk and the occasional Business Day op-ed have however failed to look at the bigger picture of the development landscape and how that aspect affects not just the NLDTF or the National Development Agency (NDA) but the manner in which we build the post-1990 envisioned development state.
     
    In attempting to deal with any process to improve the functioning of the NLDTF or the NDA, it may be prudent to acknowledge the (very large) elephant in the room, which is the obvious lack of any sort of comprehensive social service and development legislation in South Africa that provides for the holistic location of both agencies as well the myriad of other public and private sector funding in the country. The lack of this overarching legislative framework for bringing the developmental state agenda to life, is the key to unlocking the value of both agencies as well as a host of the other good and great initiatives that seek to build a more just and equitable society[1].
     
    Thus any recommendations and conclusions to improve the NDA and NLDTF need to be understood in the context of what else is needed to ensure that this situation of a poorly functioning national development agency and a misaligned national lottery funder, are both fixed and not repeated in the way we develop and implement future initiatives to realise the ideals of the Freedom Charter and Constitution. The social, cultural and economic rights[2] of the people of SA are central to the way we think about and implement the programmes and policies that seek to meet and exceed those rights.

    On a macro level, we need to commence a dialogue about the nature of the social compact to meet and exceed the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and ensure greater prosperity for all who live here. The state has claimed ownership of the developmental state and finding ways for civil society to engage meaningfully and constructively are limited. Admittedly, this is a reality of past and current modalities of engagement, but if we are looking to move ahead, then we need to be clear, as a nation, that civil society is not a secondary partner in this process. It is a collaborative relationship, where partners are engaging, on the ideals we seek to set and the process to achieve them.

    We must also be wary of the red herring touted by senior Department of Social Development (DoSD) officials about the lack of an apex civil society structure to engage with and thus, they “do not know who to engage with in civil society.” There are a range of current networks that can be called upon and if this is not enough, it is a simple matter to put out a public call for engagement.
     
    For the NLDTF and the NDA, there is a need for a piecemeal reform approach, as well as systemic change in the broad development landscape. It is possible for both these options to co-exist and given the urgent needs of the sector, we need to win space for both immediate reforms as suggested below, as well as a large-scale development priority shift.
     
    Piecemeal Reform:

    Better-designed regulations for both the NDA and the NLDTF are needed, with broad consultation and ideally this process should be funded by the respective entities but managed by civil society. In this fashion, we will have developed regulations that not only improve the functioning of the entities but are also owned by the people affected by them[3].
     
    We need a separate board for the NLDTF, to oversee the mandate of the NLDTF and ensure compliance with that mandate. This board will also serve to ensure that civil society is both represented and equally accountable for the success or failure of the NLDTF to meet its lofty mandate.
     
    We also need the Advisory Board for Social Development (Act 3 of 2001)[4] also needs to be appointed as a matter of critical urgency. It is baffling to say the least, that this matter has been outstanding for 11 years now. The appointment of such a board would ensure that talent, skills, knowledge and experience of the civil society sector is shared in the process of ensuring that development in SA takes place as a collaborative process between government, civil society, business and labour.
     
    So while we can ‘take-on’ the NLDTF in marches and media campaigns, it will serve the interests of civil society in general, much better, if we are to focus our collective energy on working together to bring about some macro-policy shifts that will create an enabling framework for a long term developmental approach to funding of civil society organisations at the coalface of delivery and those engaged in the process of constant innovation, not just of service delivery but of our thinking too.

    - Rajesh Latchman is the Coordinator of the National Welfare Forum, Volunteer Convenor of GCAP South Africa, guerrilla gardener, cyclist and an unreformed recycler. He writes in his personal capacity.



    [1] The need for an over-arching legislative framework for social services, National Welfare Forum, 2010 accessible on the following link www.forum.org.za/The-Need-for-an-Over-Arching-Legislative-Framework-May-2010
    [2] Understanding the International Covenant on economic, social and cultural rights, Coalition for ICESCR ratification, 2010 accessible on www.blacksash.org.za/files/icescrseminardoc.pdf
  • Response by Coalition on Civil Society Resource Mobilisation to Lotto Crisis

    Since 2010, a coalition of concerned civil society organisations (see below) has studied, researched and engaged with politicians and officials in both National Lotteries Distribution Trust Fund (NLDTF) - ‘the Lotto’, and the National Development Agency (NDA) on various aspects of governance structures and operations of these agencies.

    Recent developments including court judgements last year and usurped powers of a Distribution Agency as well as the withdrawal of agreed funding from various non-profit organisations lead us to issue a public call to:

    • Seriously and immediately review the developmental aid architecture in South Africa as a matter of urgency – especially in as far as this relates to resourcing of civil society organisations working for the public good.  Preferably such a review should be undertaken by the National Planning Commission (NPC) as the body charged with the realisation of the achievement of a developmental state;
       
    • Require the Public Protector as a matter of urgency, to thoroughly investigate and report within 90 days on whether the NLDTF has eroded its legislative mandate, powers and obligations under the Act, and whether the Agency has failed to carry out its function to support nonprofit organisations in South Africa.  The Public Protector should also investigate a report on whether the unilateral decisions made by the agency are in the interests of the South African people and civil society organisations which seek through various interventions to alleviate poverty, hunger and misery in various communities of our country.
    The organisations undersigned stand ready to assist in both these interventions and no doubt other like-minded patriotic South Africans will also commit to do so.

    The Lotto in South Africa has a unique history and mandate.  It is an instrument of the people’s will to support, encourage and eliminate the scourge of many of apartheid’s ills. It cannot today be converted into an agency which acts unilaterally, without the consent of the people to achieve its legislated mandate.  This is a betrayal of the urgent and desperate need of the poor and the hundreds of civil society organisations which work to alleviate and minimise the desperation of our people.

    For further comment contact Phiroshaw Camay, Mobile: 082 886 5886.

    Issued by:
    To view other NGO press releases, refer to www.ngopulse.org/group/home-page/pressreleases.

    Date published: 
    09/02/2012
    Organisation: 
    CAF Southern Africa, Co-operative for Research and Education, SANGONeT, Legal Resources Centre, National Welfare Social Service & Development Forum, CIVICUS
  • Anyone Home? A perspective on the way we work

    Next week the NLDTF will host a national consultation in Midrand with civil society to examine the functioning of the entity in relation to it's mandate. It will hopefully provide an opportunity for real engagement as opposed to a platform for the NLDTF to tell us what it is doing...

    Funding for development and social services in any country is often a political and civic hot potato, with competing agendas and lobbies vying for space and funds for every special and normal need to be addressed. The global economic recession, which got underway during 2008, does not help the situation with severe austerity measures in place in most northern economies and job losses and negative aid allocations in many southern economies. In South Africa, with our huge and fertile population, our history of political oppression and the current state of growing inequality, it becomes something slightly more challenging to think about how we move to the ideal of social cohesion from our current status as a highly unequal society. Social services and development delivery needs to be more than a mere budget allocation. It needs to be placed at the centre of our economic policy development and should inform the budget choices beyond mere social grants.

    Currently, a social service and development budget allocation becomes an ideological debate (mostly wrongly) about the evils of neo-liberal economics and capitalism and civil society as empty ranting devoid of economic understanding. While most of this is often both true and false, what is often missed is the rather large elephant in the room, which just happens to be government and the role the state plays in entrenching inequality and throwing huge sums of money at situations it sees as problems that need delivery to be kept under control.

    It is not a shortage of money that is the problem, nor is it a shortage of willing and mostly able people to deliver the services needed and lastly, it is not an unwillingness of people to work to build their own lives and this country. What is often lacking is the ability of the holders of power to adequately engage with the people and the situations we face and work together to find solutions.

    This hallmark of the liberation-movement-as-government is highlighted by the way in which the Minister of the DTI went about creating and releasing regulations for the functioning of the National Lottery in February 2010. Civil society organisations made a call in August 2006[1] for a process to develop and implement regulations to help improve the functioning of the National Lottery. Last year (2010), this idea was taken by government and implemented, with no consultation nor any engagement with the originators of the idea and now we have largely ineffective regulations governing the functioning of the National Lottery and possibly doing much more harm than good.

    This is the real reason we have a challenge making progress on pressing social, cultural and economic rights in SA and the functioning of the National Lottery and the NDA claiming a position of authority on development solutions. The state does not hold the sole power to decide what needs to be done nor (and some would argue more importantly) how, it must be done. Solutions to challenges developed and implemented from high up are not the answers to making the National Lottery or NDA work better nor are they the panacea to job creation, housing, water delivery or the rampant xenophobia in South Africa.

    The challenges we all know, live and face on a daily basis can be addressed only if we do two things, and do them soon:

    Firstly, we need a state that fully listens, understands and acts on the needs of the populace, but also and crucially to their ideas about how these needs can be met. This is relatively easy in South Africa where there are still a reasonable number of independent civil society organisations, connected to and working with people affected by and living in poverty on a daily basis. Each independent NGO or CBO is a source of ideas that can become real solutions to the ongoing challenges of poverty, illiteracy, inequality and the general malcontent people feel (and more recently expressed as violent protest). The state needs to understand that there are differing ideas about solutions and SA is a highly localised nation. We need localised interventions that support the diversity of people and ideas in each province and municipality in partnership with NGOs and CBOs. Large-scale one-size-fits-all jobs programmes have their place too but serve little good if they are not connected to what people have to go back home to.

    Secondly, we need a state that must recognise that these self-same NGOs and CBOs, which deliver critical community based social services, are ideally positioned to be leveraged as the key service providers of such services at a much lower cost than the bloated civil service[2].


    [1] Finding win win alternatives, 2006 accessible on http://www.ngopulse.org/article/lobbying-changes-lotteries-fund

    [2] White Paper for Social Welfare, 1997, Republic of South Africa p.15

  • Coalition on Civil Society Resource Mobilisation: Northern Cape Provincial Consultative Workshop

     


    Invitation to Northern Cape Provincial Consultative Workshop

    Kimberley

    17 September 2010

    South African civil society organisations are facing a complex set of sustainability and institutional development challenges. These include diminishing and/or withdrawal of international funding, leadership and identity changes, and the apparent unwillingness of government to meet its acknowledged responsibilities to the sector - in particular in regard to resource flows to civil society organisations. The sustainability of many important organisations is now compromised, a situation exacerbated by the current economic recession.

    In response to this situation, the coalition of NGOs listed above is implementing an Advocacy Programme aimed at improving the flow of allocated government resources, of the National Lottery and National Development Agency (NDA) in particular, to civil society organisations. The coalition is conducting research and consultations that will inform submissions to the relevant government departments, making concrete recommendations for changes that will improve the governance, operational efficiency and service delivery of both the NLDTF and the NDA.

    The 10th provincial consultative workshop will be held on Friday, 17 September 2010 (10h00-13h00) in Kimberley.

    If you are interested in attending this workshop, please complete the Registration Form and return it to lsmith@cafsouthernafrica.org or fax to: 011 726 3877 by no later than Wednesday, 15 September 2010.

    The first 50 respondents will receive confirmation of attendance and further workshop details.

    If you are unable to attend the consultative workshop, but are keen to give input and/or require more information on the Advocacy Programme, please contact Lucy Smith on Tel: 011 726 1148 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting              011 726 1148      end_of_the_skype_highlighting or lsmith@cafsouthernafrica.org.

    Please forward this invitation to other NGOs in your network.
    Event start date: 
    17/09/2010
    Event end date: 
    17/09/2010
    Event venue: 
    The Kimberley Club, 35 Curry Street, Kimberley
    Event type: 
    Workshop
  • Coalition on Civil Society Resource Mobilisation: Free State Provincial Consultative Workshop



    Invitation to Free State Provincial Consultative Workshop

    Bloemfontein

    16 September 2010

    South African civil society organisations are facing a complex set of sustainability and institutional development challenges. These include diminishing and/or withdrawal of international funding, leadership and identity changes, and the apparent unwillingness of government to meet its acknowledged responsibilities to the sector - in particular in regard to resource flows to civil society organisations. The sustainability of many important organisations is now compromised, a situation exacerbated by the current economic recession.

    In response to this situation, the coalition of NGOs listed above is implementing an Advocacy Programme aimed at improving the flow of allocated government resources, of the National Lottery and National Development Agency (NDA) in particular, to civil society organisations. The coalition is conducting research and consultations that will inform submissions to the relevant government departments, making concrete recommendations for changes that will improve the governance, operational efficiency and service delivery of both the NLDTF and the NDA.

    The 9th provincial consultative workshop will be held on Thursday, 16 September 2010 (10h00-13h00) in Bloemfontein.

    If you are interested in attending this workshop, please complete the Registration Form and return it to lsmith@cafsouthernafrica.org or fax to: 011 726 3877 by no later than Wednesday, 15 September 2010.

    The first 50 respondents will receive confirmation of attendance and further workshop details.

    If you are unable to attend the consultative workshop, but are keen to give input and/or require more information on the Advocacy Programme, please contact Lucy Smith on Tel: 011 726 1148 or lsmith@cafsouthernafrica.org.

    Please forward this invitation to other NGOs in your network.
    Event start date: 
    16/09/2010
    Event end date: 
    16/09/2010
    Event venue: 
    Free State Child Welfare, 54 Aliwal Street, Bloemfontein
    Event type: 
    Workshop
  • Coalition on Civil Society Resource Mobilisation: North West Provincial Consultative Workshop



    Invitation to North West Provincial Consultative Workshop

    Potchefstroom

    10 September 2010

    South African civil society organisations are facing a complex set of sustainability and institutional development challenges. These include diminishing and/or withdrawal of international funding, leadership and identity changes, and the apparent unwillingness of government to meet its acknowledged responsibilities to the sector - in particular in regard to resource flows to civil society organisations. The sustainability of many important organisations is now compromised, a situation exacerbated by the current economic recession.

    In response to this situation, the coalition of NGOs listed above is implementing an Advocacy Programme aimed at improving the flow of allocated government resources, of the National Lottery and National Development Agency (NDA) in particular, to civil society organisations. The coalition is conducting research and consultations that will inform submissions to the relevant government departments, making concrete recommendations for changes that will improve the governance, operational efficiency and service delivery of both the NLDTF and the NDA.

    This consultation is being conducted in addition to, and in collaboration with, the NDA / NLDTF questionnaire distributed by Inyathelo, SCAT, REAP and CDRA.

    The 8th provincial consultative workshop will be held on Friday, 10 September 2010 (10h00-13h00) in Potchefstroom.

    If you are interested in attending this workshop, please complete the Registration Form and return it to lsmith@cafsouthernafrica.org or fax to: 011 726 3877 by no later than Wednesday, 8 September 2010.

    The first 50 respondents will receive confirmation of attendance and further workshop details.

    If you are unable to attend the consultative workshop, but are keen to give input and/or require more information on the Advocacy Programme, please contact Lucy Smith on Tel: 011 726 1148 or lsmith@cafsouthernafrica.org.

    Please forward this invitation to other NGOs in your network.
    Event start date: 
    10/09/2010
    Event end date: 
    10/09/2010
    Event venue: 
    Lotlametswe B&B, 4 Oversteeg Street, cnr Deppe Street, Potchefstroom
    Event type: 
    Workshop
  • Coalition on Civil Society Resource Mobilisation: Report on KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Consultative Workshop







    KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Consultative Workshop - Feedback


    21 April 2010

    South African civil society organisations are facing a complex set of sustainability and institutional development challenges. These include diminishing and/or withdrawal of international funding, leadership and identity changes, and the apparent unwillingness of government to meet its acknowledged responsibilities to the sector - in particular in regard to resource flows to civil society organisations.  The sustainability of many important organisations is now compromised, a situation exacerbated by the current economic recession.

    In response to this situation, the coalition of 7 NGOs listed above is implementing an Advocacy Programme aimed at improving the flow of allocated government resources, of the National Lottery and National Development Agency (NDA) in particular, to civil society organisations. The coalition is conducting research and consultations that will inform submissions to the relevant government departments, making concrete recommendations for changes that will improve the governance, operational efficiency and service delivery of both the NLDTF and the NDA.

    The first provincial consultative workshop was held on 21 April 2010 in Durban.

    To read the workshop report, click here.

    For more information on the Advocacy Programme, please contact Lucy Smith on Tel: 011 726 1148 or lucy@cafsouthernafrica.org.
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    KZN_21_April_2010_CS_Dialogue.pdf403.75 KB
  • National Development Agency / National Lotteries Distribution Trust Fund Survey

    Four South African NGOs, namely Inyathelo - The South African Institute for Advancement, Social Change Assistance Trust (SCAT), Community Development Resource Association (CDRA) and Rural Education Access Programme, have launched a survey into the funding practices of the National Lotteries Distribution Trust Fund (NLDTF) and the National Development Agency (NDA).

    The survey is aimed at, amongst other things, documenting NGOs’ experiences with the NDA and NLDTF.

    The findings will be used to articulate NGOs’ concerns with the two funding agencies through constructive engagement.

    Click here to participate in the survey.
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    Survey_questionniare1902101.doc794.5 KB
  • NGOs to Analyse Funding Practices by the Lotteries and NDA

    Four influential organisations in the non-profit sector have launched a research project to establish why the National Lotteries Distribution Fund (NLDF) and the National Development Agency (NDA) have been ineffective  in their  roles to provide support for those in need in South Africa.

    The four organisations are the Social Change Assistance Trust, Community Development Resource Agency, Inyathelo - The South African Institute for Advancement, and Rural Education Access Programme. The decision to launch the project comes in the wake of increasing reports that charities and other organisations in civil society are struggling to cope in the current recession.

    To read the medial release, "Four NGOs Launch Research Campaign to Analyse Funding Practices by the Lotteries to Civil Society", click here.
    Source: 
    <br />
  • Four NGOs Launch Research Campaign to Analyse Funding Practices by the Lotteries to Civil Society

    Four influential organisations in the NGO sector have launched a research project to establish why the National Lotteries Distribution Fund (NLDF) and the National Development Agency (NDA) have been ineffective in their roles to provide support for those in need in South Africa.
    Four influential organisations in the non-profit sector have launched a research project to establish why the National Lotteries Distribution Fund (NLDF) and the National Development Agency (NDA) have been ineffective  in their  roles to provide support for those in need in South Africa.

    The four organisations are Social Change Assistance Trust, Community Development Resource Agency, Inyathelo - The South African Institute for Advancement, and Rural Education Access Programme. The announcement of the launch comes in the wake of increasing reports that charities and other organisations in civil society are struggling to cope in the current recession.

    In a statement released today the organisations note that there have also been several media reports recently relating to the tardiness of the NLDF in responding to applications from organisations in civil society.

    Speaking on behalf of Scat, CDRA, Inyathelo and REAP, Shelagh Gastrow said: “We have agreed that neither the NLDF nor the NDA are meeting their mandates, as defined in law, nor are they realising their potential to address South Africa’s development challenges. The scope of their funding is limited and beneficiary constituencies appear to have no say in the strategies of these agencies.”

    The four organisations said that the NLDF and the NDA should have effective mechanisms to channel public resources to the non public sector. “However, these agencies have developed a bureaucratic approach and technocrats within them have increasingly played a role in defining development.”

    Civil society had also not found effective ways to engage government. James Taylor of CDRA added that the four organisations had noted that there had been cause to “take on” the lotteries and the NDA amidst much anecdotal evidence of poor funding practice, lost documentation, inefficiency and lack of care. “We believe that any action taken by civil society needs to be based on grounded facts established through research and analysis. We plan to undertake this exercise and commit to disseminating our findings to the civil society sector, encouraging organisations to use the material and information in a myriad of ways such as in campaigns, engagement with the state or in parliament,” he said.

    As a second stage of their work, the four organisations will undertake research into other funding resources to the sector. This will involve not only size and scope, but also the processes involved including issues relating to power relations, mutual accountability, decision-making, long-term planning and commitments, and the effectiveness of funding relationships and exit strategies. Interim reports will be released during the research process to create awareness of key findings as they emerge.

    Ultimately, the aim of the group’s research will be to enable the non-profit sector to take responsibility to define what it sees as the basic principles of good funding practice in South Africa that would
    • promote human relationships and caring;
    • respond to the context and the constituency;
    • encourage good development practice;
    • create opportunities for organisations and people to engage in civic life; and
    • enable civil society to take responsibility for our sector and its importance in ensuring democracy and the protection of the poor and vulnerable.
    ENDS STATEMENT
     
    Issued by Quo Vadis Communications on behalf of Inyathelo - The South African Institute for Advancement, Social Change Assistance Trust, Centre for Developmental Practice and Rural Education Access Programme
     
    ABOUT THE FOUR ORGANISATIONS:
     
    Inyathelo
    The South African Institute of Advancement, colloquially known as Inyathelo (advancement in isiXhosa) is a world-recognised organisation dedicated to building a sustainable South African civil society.  Its core work is to advance social change by working with key institutions and non-profit organisations to ensure their long-term sustainability. This is done by developing their own capacity to raise private investment towards advancing their objectives.  Whilst working with organisations to develop their resource mobilisation skills.  The Institute promotes social responsibility, personal philanthropy, voluntarism and self-reliance.
    SCAT
    The Social Change Assistance Trust (Scat) is an independent fund-raising and grant-making development agency. Its vision is of vibrant and sustainable communities in rural South Africa.  Its mission is to partner with rural community-owned agencies in order to improve the quality of life in their communities. Scat works within a partnership context to support such local agencies in development and human rights work in rural communities of the Northern, Eastern and Western Cape and the North West Provinces.  The focus is on human rights, gender equity, HIV, AIDS and local economic development. The rural partner organisations, which Scat refers to as Local Development Agencies (LDAs), are managed by elected members of the communities they serve.
    CDRA
    Centre for Developmental Practice (CDRA) works with development practitioners, organisations and movements who are engaged in social transformation with marginalised communities. They aim to bring about and support authentic and coherent development practice amongst people, organisations and institutions working towards those forms of social transformation. Their purpose is to contribute to building a society that is sustainable and civil and they promote organising principles, processes and practices that promote inclusion, dignity and development.  
    REAP
    The Rural Education Access Programme assists students from poor rural communities to access tertiary education. REAP provides students with a support and development programme to enable success with their studies. It aims to develop confident young South Africans, with capacity and sound values. REAP calls on state mechanisms such as the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) to assist poor students and it provides add-on value necessary for their success.

    Media Contact:    
    Chantal Meugens
    Quo Vadis Communications
    Cell phone: 083 676 2294 / landline: 011 487 0026
    Interviews can be arranged through Quo Vadis Communications
    Client Contact:    
    Shelagh Gastrow
    Phone: 021 465 6981
    James Taylor
    Phone: 021 462 3902

     
    Date published: 
    27/08/2009
    Organisation: 
    Inyathelo-The South African Institute for Advancement
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