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  • Police Intimidation Continues in Swaziland

    Swaziland Police have harassed another progressive, Sifiso Mabuza, deputy secretary of the Swaziland National Association of Teachers.

    About 30 armed police raided his home claiming they were looking for explosives, where they found none. Mabuza told local media the police questioned him about his union activities and threatened him.

    Swaziland has a history of attacking workers' rights. It has banned the workers' federation, the Trades Union Congress of Swaziland, broken up its meeting and harassed and arrested its leaders.

    To read the article titled, “Police intimidation continues,” click here.

    Source: 
    All Africa
  • NGOs Hailed for Refurbishing Classrooms

    Tanzania’s Kagera Regional Commissioner, Fabian Massawe, has hailed Pestalozzi Children's Foundation (PCF) of Switzerland and Voluntary Service Overseas (VSO) for the timely intervention in constructing and renovating several classrooms in Bukoba District.

    Massawe points out that, "The government appreciates Public Private Partnership (PPP). The assistance is timely. We thank the two NGOs [non-governmental organisations] and the people of Switzerland for their good spirit. Other NGOs should emulate the example."

    VSO programme manager, Christopher Munubi, says five classrooms and two teachers' houses were renovated at Nyakato Primary School including toilets and a water tank with capacity of 2 000 litres.

    To read the article titled, “Kagera RC hails NGOs for refurbishing classrooms,” click here.

    Source: 
    All Africa
  • Feeding Scheme Benefits Cape Flats Learners

    More than 500 learners from the Surrey Primary School in Manenberg on the Cape Flats are benefitting from a feeding scheme run by the Department of Basic Education together with Foodbank South Africa and a breakfast cereal company.

    On World Food Day, 16 October, it is estimated that one in five children in South Africa go to school on an empty stomach.

    Principal of Surrey Primary School, Imtiaz Adams, says that, “Our numbers are growing, but presently we're feeding between 500 and 550 children every morning out of a possible 880 children. So that's 60 to 70 percent of our school rely on this breakfast.”

    To read the article titled, “Cape Flats learners benefit from feeding scheme,” click here.

    Source: 
    SABC News
  • School Closed With No Plan - SECTION27

    Legal advocacy group, SECTION27, says that a Northern Cape school that closed over asbestos pollution concerns did so without a plan for the pupils’ continued education.

    According to SECTION27’s Sasha Stevenson, the Khiba Junior Secondary School, serving 220 pupils from mostly poor backgrounds in Ga-Mopedi village in the JT Gaetsewe district, closed on Monday, 13 October 2015.

    Stevenson argues that, “The closure has happened without any consultation with the school governing body (SGB) or the community. Most of the learners have now been sent home.”

    To read the article titled, “School closed with no plan – SECTION27,” click here.

    Source: 
    The Citizen
  • Teachers Demand More Education Funds

    Teachers in Zambia have urged the government to increase the budgetary allocation to the education sector if Zambia is to achieve the Vision 2030 development agenda.
     
    Zambia National Union of Teachers deputy general secretary, David Banda, says the education sector continues to face numerous challenges in its efforts to deliver quality education.
     
    Speaking during the commemoration of the World Teachers Day, Banda asserted that inadequate finances towards the Ministry of Education continue to be a major challenge which has led to poor infrastructure in most schools.
     
    To read the article titled, “Teachers want more education funds,” click here.

    Source: 
    Times of Zambia
  • Blame Bad Teachers for Bad Schools - Motshekga

    Basic Education Minister, Angie Motshekga, says the blame for schools that perform badly should be laid at the door of teachers.
     
    Motshekga points out that, “Whenever I go to schools that perform well and ask principals what it is that they do to make their schools work, time and again they tell me the same thing: they have a group of dedicated, committed and caring teachers.”
     
    She is of the view that, “Where things don’t work, teachers are not doing their jobs right. They don’t complete the curriculum, they jump topics, they are not in class and they often don’t understand the content of what they teach.”
     
    To read the article titled, “Blame bad teachers for bad schools - Angie Motshekga,” click here.

    Source: 
    City Press
  • SA NGO Wins Top UNESCO Award

    A South African non-governmental organisation, Molteno Institute for Language and Literacy, has received the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation’s (UNESCO) Confucius Prize for Literacy.

    The Confucius Prize for Literacy award was presented on International Literacy Day - 8 September 2014 - and its candidacy was supported by the Ministry of Basic Education and the South African National Commission for UNESCO.

    Molteno chief executive, Masennya Dikotla, points out that the recommendation by the Department of Basic Education shows the trust they have in the work that Molteno does, adding that, “We dedicate this prize to the children of our beloved country and will use the prize money to ensure a better future for them.”

    To read the article titled, “SA NGO receives top UNESCO award,” click here.

    Source: 
    IOL News
  • NGO Wins an International Award

    A South African non-governmental organisation, Partners for Possibility, which pairs business people and school principals to improve school management and teaching, has won an international award in Belgium.

    Partners for Possibility received the award for Innovative and Creative Partnerships in Africa for its solution to the challenges facing education in South Africa.

    The oganisation’s founder Louise Van Rhyn says that, “The wonderful thing is that normally South Africans go internationally for ideas, “adding that, “…people from other countries are acknowledging that what we’re doing in South Africa is worth paying attention to.”

    To read the article titled, “Local NGO wins award in Belgium,” click here.

    Source: 
    Eye Witness News
  • Limpopo Schools Still Without Textbooks

    Eight months into the academic year, pupils at a rural school in Limpopo still do not have textbooks.
     
    The school governing body (SGB) at Ramalawane Secondary School in Ga-Mphahlele village, in the Lepelle-Nkumpi Municipality, say their repeated pleas to have outstanding textbooks delivered have fallen on deaf ears.
     
    SGB member, Masese Madigoe, says that the school required 105 textbooks for maths, physical science, geography, Sepedi and life orientation, adding that pupils in grades 9, 10 and 11 are affected by the non-delivery of textbooks.
     
    To read the article titled, “Limpopo pupils still without books,” click here.

    Source: 
    IOL News
  • SAHRC: Number of SA Schools Declines

    The South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) says that despite a growing school population, the number of South African schools has declined.

    In its new report, the SAHRC says that approximately 2 000 schools have been closed down between 2000 and 2012.
     
    SAHRC’s Carmen Abdoll, points out that most of the schools are in the Free State, and believes there is a risk that pupils in those areas are being disadvantaged.

    To read an article titled, “Number of SA schools on the decline: SAHRC,” click here.

    Source: 
    SABC News
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