leadership

leadership

  • UN Pays Tribute to President Mandela

    The United Nations (UN) secretary-general, Ban Ki-Moon, has described former president, Nelson Mandela as ‘a giant for justice’ whose ‘selfless struggle for human dignity, equality and freedom’ inspired many people around the world.

    Ban told reporters soon after Mandela’s death was announced by President Jacob Zuma that, "No one did more in our time to advance the values and aspirations of the United Nations."

    He says he was deeply touched when he met Mandela in February 2009, adding that, “When I thanked him for his life's work, he insisted the credit belonged to others."

    To read the article titled, “UN chief calls Mandela 'a giant for justice',” click here.

    Source: 
    News24
  • Gigaba Criticises Opposition Parties, NGOs

    African National Congress (ANC) national executive committee member and Minister of Public Enterprises, Malusi Gigaba, has criticised opposition parties and non-governmental organisations for telling foreign countries that South Africa has failed since democracy.

    Gigaba told the South African Democratic Teachers' Union (SADTU) that, "All around us, the opportunists, the pessimists, the opposition and the counter-revolutionists are telling us what we have achieved in the last 19 years has been nothing and this revolution faces its inevitable doom."

    He further states that some opposition leaders have went to countries like the United States and spoke ill of development in South Africa in aims of getting money from them.

    To read article titled, “Gigaba criticises doomsayers,” click here.

    Source: 
    SABC News
  • Women Leadership Key to Reconciliation

    Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, executive director of United Nations Women says the leadership of women is central to reconciliation and conflict resolution.
     
    Mlambo-Ngcuka, addressed the United Nations Security Council moments after the body unanimously adopted a resolution reaffirming the central role of women in the peaceful resolution of conflicts and peace building.
     
    She pointed out that gains in women’s participation are neither consistent nor as sustained as they should be, furthermore, women’s leadership and collective action has changed the world by combating violence against women and building equality.

    To read the article titled, “Women leadership key to reconciliation: UN,” click here.

    Source: 
    SABC News
  • Green Ultra Right Bombers

    So if you are wondering why the long silence since the post last week, well…I am in Durban after all, where things tend to move a little slower than Joburg and about as fast as Cape Town. And it has been busy: the ‘People’s Space’ at University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN), mostly at the initiative of Patrick Bond, has taken off and is always buzzing with energy, people and a whole herd of news crews from local and international media. There are activists, socialists, NGO people, more activists and a whole bunch of artists as well, mostly thanks to the Climate Train initiative and the great crew that was on board that long trip around South Africa to Durban.

    The ‘occupy space’ has also been buzzing and you should take a look at the video post from the Ambush Collective who descended upon it and built a wonderful garden for the future. Which brings us neatly to another aspect of the ‘occupy space’ in Durban. It is not your classic people-driven occupy, but rather a city approved space for people to occupy during COP17, which was negotiated with the city by the civil society representatives on the C17. It is in that sense a new kind of occupy, a government approved and temporary allowance for people to express and engage.  While there are so many ideological issues with such a concept, I am trying to be brave and creative enough to let go off those issues and ideas of occupy as we know it from OWS and focus on what has been happening there and maybe, some thinking about what may come of it post COP17. So far, nothing has come of the ‘occupy space’ since the march on Saturday, 3 December 2011 and in the words of my colleague, John Treat, it is now de-funked, which may go some way towards debunking the myth that international NGOs (INGOs) are capable of hijacking the occupy idea. That is something we should all be very grateful for.

    And that is pretty much where I feel we can leave this blog as it seems that my assertion that NGOs and other movements in civil society will try to co-opt and cannibalise the ideals and methods of occupy for their current agendas was in fact prescient – but, I feel that maybe I am being too harsh on the people and processes in SA. And there is good reason to be kinder to our levels of (dis)organisation and the nuances of our political history which make engagements with the SA government a challenge fraught with tensions and high-drama instead of a simple critical intellectual engagement and consensus building on moving forward.

    The how and why we are here mired in this stalemate is the subject of not just another blog but of several issuances from academics to cartoonists, locally and across the know universe. Yet, we as people of this nation and across all sectors seem unwilling to be brave enough to change or are too content with this divided society we are building. Or maybe it is simply that we do not care enough about how we work or fail to. Almost all conversations with locals and visitors alike tend to lead back to the question of leadership and lack thereof among civil society organisations as the key weakness in our ability to engage critically and effectively with government. And I tend to agree, though I still hold that the concept of an apex representative structure for civil society that is recognised by government is not just outmoded but also potentially harmful to the growth of ideas that manifest as ideals and changes to the stark poverty and inequality in SA. But going back to agreeing with the notion that there is a lack of leadership in the sector and what some sober and principled leadership can achieve: for a start it may help with my desire to see a better engagement process than the current hobbled together rigmarole of government doing things, civil society organisations responding negatively to it and inevitably a court process to find a better solution. I find it baffling that, in a country with a globally lauded Constitution and a rich pool of intellectual talent, we are seemingly constantly finding ourselves at loggerheads with each other over things that, at first glance at least, seem pretty obvious or common sense. A good example is the demands around climate secrets by Right2Know and while the demands themselves make for interesting reading, the fact that we must demand these things, seems to me that the ideals of the Freedom Charter are somehow being lost in this transition to a form of capitalist sanctioned democracy we are building… but maybe that is a blog for another day.
     
    The march on 3 December was a great show of both strength and courage from a range of people and organisations not willing to be boxed into corners by a government that is increasingly moving further right in the way it treats its people. The use of what Rehad Desai calls the “Green Bombers” to intimidate other allegedly anti-government civil society groups was an appalling act of machismo and it is worth reading Rehad’s post about the incident on Facebook.

    I am reminded of the outburst from former President Thabo Mbeki about the ‘ultra-leftists’ and how perceptions of political allegiance and positioning are really just perspectives. Maybe Mbeki did not realise how far right he had moved and thus some people did seem to him to be ultra left. Which is pretty much where we seem to be going with the COP17 process. The current deal period is about to expire in 2012 and with no deal here in Durban, it just means that we will have to deal with what is left, instead of doing what is right.

    - Rajesh Latchman is the Coordinator of the National Welfare Forum, Volunteer Convenor of GCAP South Africa, guerrilla gardener, cyclist and an unreformed recycler. He writes in his personal capacity.

    Flickr image: 
    3 Dec 2011
  • African Leadership Academy: Maintenance Manager

    African Leadership Academy
    Please note: this opportunity closing date has passed and may not be available any more.
    Opportunity closing date: 
    Monday, December 2, 2013
    Opportunity type: 
    Employment
    African Leadership Academy (ALA) seeks to catalyse large-scale change in Africa by developing thousands of transformative leaders for the continent over the next few decades. ALA’s model for change involves three steps: ALA identifies the most outstanding young leaders across Africa; develops these young leaders through an innovative, life-long programme that focuses on hands-on practice; and fosters powerful, life-long networks for these leaders that position them to achieve large-scale impact in Africa.

    ALA seeks to catalyse large-scale change in Africa by developing thousands of transformative leaders for the continent over the next few decades. Our model for change involves three steps: (1) We identify the most outstanding young people across Africa with leadership potential; (2) We develop these young leaders through an innovative, life-long program that focuses on hands-on practice; and (3) We foster powerful, life-long networks for these leaders that position them to achieve large-scale impact in Africa. ALA aims to develop the next Nelson Mandela, the next James Mwangi, the next Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, and the African Sam Walton, Jonas Salk, and Steve Jobs.

    ALA seeks to appoint a Maintenance Manager, based at the ALA Campus, Johannesburg.

    The Maintenance Manager will be responsible for the ongoing repairs and maintenance of ALA’s buildings, facilities and grounds. The person will report to Director of Operations.

    The position is responsible for managing the maintenance team, overseeing campus construction projects and liaising with external contractors. In particular, the role includes:
    • Maintaining school buildings and grounds and performing all necessary janitorial services to a high standard and compliance with relevant legislation and industry codes;
    • Responding to basic works requests such as: door repairs; plumbing; carpentry and joinery assistance;
    • Supervising the Academy’s team of maintenance and grounds staff;
    • Advising management on external contractors and overseeing the work of these contractors on campus; and
    • Managing spending on supplies, tools and equipment to ensure it is appropriate and within budget.
    Requirements:
    • Matric is essential, an NQF Level three technical qualification is advantageous;
    • Minimum of two years experience in facilities and operations particularly in basic ‘all-round’ civil maintenance and construction trades such as brickwork, plastering, basic electrical, plumbing, painting, lock smith and carpentry;
    • Excellent written and verbal English language communication skills;
    • Ability to use computers and basic proficiency in Microsoft Word;
    • Ability to take initiative and work with limited supervision;
    • Practical knowledge of safety and health regulations, permits, building codes, procedures; and
    • Motor vehicle driver’s licence a must.
    Salary: Commensurate with experience.
     
    Starting date: January 2014.
     
    To apply, submit a CV and motivation letter to employment@africanleadershipacademy.org. The submission should include contact information of at least three professional references.

    Please quote the source of this advertisement in your application - NGO Pulse Portal.

    Candidates will be interviewed on a rolling basis. The submission should include contact information for at least three professional references. Interviews and background checks will occur upon receipt and screening of application.

    For more about the African Leadership Academy, refer to www.africanleadershipacademy.org.

    For other vacancies in the NGO sector, refer to www.ngopulse.org/vacancies.

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  • No Ibrahim Prize for 2013

    The Mo Ibrahim Foundation's independent Prize Committee has decided not to award this year's 2013 Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership.

    To win the prize, laureates must be democratically elected former African head of state or government who has left office in the previous three years, have served their constitutionally mandated term, among others.

    The Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership is the largest prize in the world, worth an annual US$5 million over 10 years and US$200 000 annually for life thereafter.

    To read the article titled, “No winner of the 2013 Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership,” click here.

    Source: 
    All Africa
  • Cronje Appointed New SAIRR CEO

    The South African Institute of Race Relations (SAIRR) has appointed Frans Cronje as its new chief executive officer.

    Cronje, who will be taking over from John Kane-Berman who retires at the end of February next year, joined SAIRR’s research department in 2004 and since taken over responsibility for the organisation’s marketing drive while also launching its Risk Analysis.

    Meanwhile, SAIRR president and the University of the Free State vice-chancellor, Professor Jonathan Jansen, describes Cronje’s appointment as ‘wonderful news for independent research and courageous thinking in South Africa today’.

    To read the article titled, “SAIRR gets new CEO,” click here.

    Source: 
    SABC News
  • Ibrahim Criticises Africa's Ageing Leaders

    Sudanese-born billionaire, Mo Ibrahim, has castigated Africa's ageing leaders for crowding out young blood.

    The philanthropist, who also founded the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, argues that the average age of leaders on the African continent is around 60 years, yet half of the population was under the age of 19.

    Speaking at a lecture in honour of Nelson Mandela, the businessman drew comparisons between African and American leaders, where President Barack Obama became president at the 47 whereas former President, Bill Clinton, became president when he was 46.

    To read the article titled, “Ibrahim blasts Africa's ageing leaders,” click here.

    Source: 
    News 24
  • African Leadership Academy: External Relations Associate Director

    African Leadership Academy (ALA)
    Please note: this opportunity closing date has passed and may not be available any more.
    Opportunity closing date: 
    Wednesday, July 31, 2013
    Opportunity type: 
    Employment


     -
    African Leadership Academy (ALA) seeks to catalyse large-scale change in Africa by developing thousands of transformative leaders for the continent over the next few decades. ALA’s model for change involves three steps: ALA identifies the most outstanding young leaders across Africa; develops these young leaders through an innovative, life-long programme that focuses on hands-on practice; and fosters powerful, life-long networks for these leaders that position them to achieve large-scale impact in Africa.

    ALA seeks to appoint a External Relations Associate Director, based at the ALA Campus, Johannesburg, South Africa.

    The successful candidate will report to the VP and Director of Strategic Relations within the Strategic Relations Team.

    Responsibilities:
    • Manages ALA’s donor portfolio;
    • Develop proposals and reports to key individual and institutional donors;
    • Manage the collection of donations to ALA;
    • Conduct analysis on ALA’s institutional and individual donors;
    • Oversee the execution of campus guest relations, campus visits, external opportunities, and the on-campus speaker series;
    • Support of the key strategic priority of financial sustainability;
    • Research and develop proposals to prospective institutional/individual donors;
    • Report writing and management of all donor-related communications;
    • Manage donations, tracking spend and collection of outstanding amounts;
    • Donor data management and analytics; and
    • Oversight of campus visits, guest speaker series, and external opportunities.
    Requirements:
    • Master’s in relevant field such as business administration;
    • Minimum of five year’s work experience preferably in a consulting environment;
    • Experience developing proposals particularly for not for profit organisations;
    • Writing skills;
    • Client management skills, preferably within a corporate setting;
    • Proficiency in research, data analysis, management and presentation;
    • Driven, detail oriented and flexible with working hours;
    • Ability to operate under pressure and meet tight deadlines; and
    • Proactive in problem-solving, goal-setting and implementing more efficient processes.
    To apply, submit a CV and motivation letter to employment@africanleadershipacademy.org.The submission should include contact information of atleast three professional references.

    Please quote the source of this advertisement in your application - NGO Pulse Portal.

    Candidates will be interviewed on a rolling basis.

    Interviews and background checks will occur upon receipt and screening of application.

    For more about the African Leadership Academy, refer to www.africanleadershipacademy.org.

    For other vacancies in the NGO sector, refer to www.ngopulse.org/vacancies.

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  • Ndifuna Ukwazi: Junior Researcher

    Ndifuna Ukwazi
    Please note: this opportunity closing date has passed and may not be available any more.
    Opportunity closing date: 
    Friday, July 19, 2013
    Opportunity type: 
    Employment
    Ndifuna Ukwazi (NU) is a Cape Town-based NGO that promotes understanding, engagement and collaboration on social justice issues in order to foster active citizenship and leadership in South Africa. A central activity of NU is providing legal and research support to partner social justice organisations. This is done with the goal of improving the living conditions of poor and vulnerable people, as well as to achieve social justice and the safeguarding of human rights in South Africa and elsewhere.

    NU seeks to appoint a Junior Researcher, based in Cape Town.

    The successful candidate will be employed in the Research Team at NU with a focus on legal and political research.

    The Junior Researcher will report to the Interim Deputy Director.

    This is a 12 month contract, renewable for an additional year subject to availability of funds and performance of the employee.

    Responsibilities:
    • Variety of research and information-sourcing tasks with a focus on legal work;
    • Support colleagues and partners in legal research, research design, coalition building, analysis and report writing;
    • Prepare and edit press statements, petitions and other materials for public engagement;
    • Assist the Director of NU with teaching and tutoring in the Fellowship Programme, primarily in the Politics, Law and Society Course;
    • Participate in conceptualisation, correspondence and problem-solving;
    • Perform any reasonable tasks that require research, whether that be obtaining legal documents from reliable sources and engaging with government or summarising and assessing such documents;
    • Organise/ assist in organising: seminars, lectures, press conferences, dialogues, talks etc. that focus on social justice and human rights issues that will be held or hosted by NU;
    • Write op-eds and pieces for various publications relating to activities by NU, its partner organisations and current events;
    • Write briefs on issues NU or its partner organisations are or could be involved in;
    • Write and edit  the People’s Law Journal; compiling at least one piece per month subject to the editors’ requirements;
    • Write opinions on activities NU and its partner organisations are involved in where there may be litigation or legal consequences;
    • Represent NU by attending seminars, meetings, pickets, marches and any other activities organized by NU and any of its partners; and
    • Assist NU staff members of the staff on any projects that they are involved in.
    Requirements:
    • Degree in Law from a reputable higher education institute or a similar degree with relevant experience;
    • Besides having to demonstrate a level of legal and/or political knowledge and skill, he/she will also have to demonstrate a high level of writing, analytical and computer skills;
    • Commitment to working in an environment advancing the social justice rights of all people in South Africa and elsewhere.
    To apply, submit a CV and motivation letter to contact@nu.org.za.

    Please quote the source of this advertisement in your application - NGO Pulse Portal.

    Enquiries: 021 423 3089

    For more about Ndifuna Ukwazi, refer to http://nu.org.za.

    For other vacancies in the NGO sector, refer to www.ngopulse.org/vacancies.

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