animal rights

animal rights

  • Free-Range Food a Can of Worms - NGO

    Animal rights organisation, Beauty without Cruelty, says there is no such thing as a happy chicken.
     
    The organisation’s national chairperson, Beryl Scott, says because of the treatment of even so-called free-range animals in South Africa, the organisation does not advocate the eating of chickens, eggs or other meat in South Africa.
     
    Though consumers have the option of buying free-range eggs and organic meat, South Africa does not have laws that clearly define the terms ‘free range’ or ‘organic’.
     
    To read the article titled, “Free-range food a can of worms,” click here.

    Source: 
    Times Live
  • Tshwane SPCA: Bookkeeper

    Tshwane SPCA
    Please note: this opportunity closing date has passed and may not be available any more.
    Opportunity closing date: 
    Wednesday, November 20, 2013
    Opportunity type: 
    Employment
    The Tshwane SPCA is a registered NGO with branches in Waltoo and Centurion. We are currently looking for a qualified bookkeeper to join our team.

    The Tshwane SPCA seeks to appoint a Bookkeeper, based in Pretoria.

    Responsibilities:
    • Management of our payroll;
    • Accounts payable and receivable;
    • Tax and other statuary returns;
    • Bank and balance returns;
    • Monthly reports;
    • General administration tasks.
    Requirements:
    • Minimum of five years experience;
    • Pastel Partner version 12;
    • VIP Classic version 4.2a;
    • MS Office (in particular MS Excel).
    To apply, submit a CV with a motivation letter to admin@spcapta.org.za.

    Please quote the source of this advertisement in your application - NGO Pulse Portal.

    For more about the Tshwane SPCA, refer to www.spcapta.org.za.

    For other vacancies in the NGO sector, refer to www.ngopulse.org/vacancies.

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  • Tshwane SPCA: Intern Administrative Assistant

    Tshwane SPCA
    Please note: this opportunity closing date has passed and may not be available any more.
    Opportunity closing date: 
    Friday, October 25, 2013
    Opportunity type: 
    Employment
    The Tshwane SPCA serves to protect animals and prevent cruelty to animals in the greater Tshwane Metro.  The organisation has two branches – one in Waltloo and one in Centurion. 

    Tshwane SPCA seeks to appoint an Intern Administrative Assistant based in Waltloo branch, Pretoria.
     
    Responsibilities:
    • Assist in reception and switchboard when necessary;
    • Compile and update donor database;
    • Input all financial donations under name and reference of donor;
    • Input all data accurately and in a timely manner;
    • Thank all donations according to appeal and / or donation received;
    • Extract data from database for mailings;
    • Provide monthly reports;
    • Assist in marketing and public relations;
    • Compile and update monthly and annual statistics;
    • Support other activities within the fundraising department.
    Requirements:
    • Grade 12 certificate with appropriate experience and 3 years tertiary qualification;
    • Proficiency in English, written and orally;
    • Friendly, professional mannerism in dealing with the public both face to face and telephonically;
    • Computer literate in Microsoft  Packages;
    • Accuracy and confidentiality;
    • Strong interest in animal welfare;
    • Creative and flexible approach to work, and ability to work well independently and within a team;
    • High level of flexibility and initiative. 
    The successful candidate must be willing to start immediately. A stipend to cover transport costs will be offered.
     
    To apply, submit a CV (maximum two pages) and a motivation letter to admin@spcapta.org.za.

    Please quote the source of this advertisement in your application - NGO Pulse Portal.

    For details contact Korky Levanon, Tel: 012 6645644

    If you have not heard from the Tshwane SPCA by 1 November 2013, consider your application unsuccessful.

    For more about the Tshwane SPCA, refer to www.spcapta.org.za.

    For other vacancies in the NGO sector, refer to www.ngopulse.org/vacancies.

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  • The Tourist Trap: Five Myths Promoting Wild Animal Exploitation Exposed

    Often due to lack of awareness, many unsuspecting tourists and locals fall into the trap of believing a holiday around sunny South Africa to ‘take in the big five’ and other wildlife romps causes no harm. And in some cases, they believe that they may even be supporting conservation or improving the welfare of wild animals.
     
    Forget carbon footprint: the trail of destruction caused by the exploitation of wild animals should equally be cause for alarm.
     
    “Every living creature has intrinsic value but that value should not be measured in terms of financial gain,” says executive director, Marcelle Meredith, of the National Council of SPCAs (NSPCA). “Animals are sentient beings, and we have a moral obligation not to cause them harm in the name of our entertainment.”
     
    Meredith firmly believes that by creating awareness and providing education to the public, the
    NSPCA can help eliminate the suffering animals endure.
     
    “We firmly believe that many people do not know the truth, and that if they did, they would use this newfound knowledge to make sound choices,” says Meredith. “Ignorance is certainly not bliss.”
     
    Lionesses are not good mothers
     
    Although lion breeders and captive lion facilities may mislead the public into believing they have stepped in to protect the welfare of the cubs, as they are abandoned by their mothers in captivity this is rarely the case. In actual fact, lionesses by nature are very good parents and are fiercely protective of their offspring.
     
    According to Ainsley Hay, manager of the Wildlife Protection Unit at the NSPCA, forcibly removing the cubs from their mother is very traumatic to both the lionesses and her cubs, and usually done purely for financial gain.
     
    Avoid the Trap: It is unlikely that a facility will always have several baby cubs on hand for ‘petting’ due to parental abandonment. It is more likely that this is a result of the growing captive bred lion industry seeking the financial rewards and incentives from the unsuspecting public.
     
    Captive breeding of predators promotes conservation
     
    Facilities that continuously breed wild animals for the purpose of removing their offspring to enable human interactions for profit only fulfils a recreation role; there is no educational or conservation message.
     
    “People only learn that this is a cute wild animal that can be controlled for human entertainment,” says Hay.
     
    Now, these once ‘wild’ animals are bred specifically for unnatural colour mutations and morphs. These animals are often genetically compromised and can suffer from a variety of ailments and illnesses.
     
    Once these animals are no longer considered cute and cuddly, or begin to exhibit their natural wild traits, they become fodder for trophy or canned hunting, or the lion bone wine industry.
     
    “This is not conservation,” states Hay. “It’s farming.”
     
    Avoid the Trap: The NSPCA cautions against supporting facilities that keep wild animals in captivity, and rather support facilities that allow wild animals to remain in the wild. Or bona fide sanctuaries that provide safe havens and refuges to the victims of the captive wildlife industry. Supporting facilities that promote interactions with wild animals inadvertently compromises their welfare.
     
    Porcupine quills and ostrich feathers are laying around
     
    Yes, porcupines lose their quills and birds of a feather do moult, however they are not lost in large enough quantities to sustain this growing trend. Porcupines do not shed enough quills to feed the booming curio industry; these animals are poached, farmed or shot to supply the demand.
     
    The feather industry, once a by-product of farming, has become increasingly brutal. Although traditionally feathers were collected after a bird has been humanely killed for the meat industry, it has been discovered that birds are being de-feathered live, before being killed, an excruciatingly painful process for the animal. Farmers complained that the feathers became covered in blood if plucked after the bird had been slaughtered. However, beyond the pain, plucking a live bird leaves bloody follicles and causes skin damage to the birds.
     
    Avoid the Trap: Any souvenirs made from animals: tusks, ivory, porcupine quills, or fur indicates an animal is being harmed, and likely poached or farmed, to keep up with the demand.
     
    The faux-pas about fake fur
     
    Fur trim is often perceived to be fake but may well be cat or dog fur as they are cheaper to use. Fox fur, for example, has become so cheap that it has replaced the artificial article. Dyeing fur bright colours also disguises the fact that the fur is real, and manufacturers in China have been known to stitch in labels onto cat or dog fur products to disguise the true identity of these items and make them more marketable.
     
    In a test, the NSPCA purchased a ‘furry’ cat figurine and sent it to the Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute for forensic testing. The results came back stating that although it was not possible to determine exactly what kind of animal fur it was because of the tanning method that had been used, there was no doubt that it had been made from real fur.
     
    Avoid the Trap: Fur-clad figurines, often sold at flea markets and gift shops, are suspected of being covered with genuine mammalian fur. The power is the hands of the consumers: refuse to buy products containing or including real or fake fur, and inform the owner that will only support their goods once they stop stocking animal-based novelties.
     
    Animals that are bred in captivity are happy in captivity
     
    Wild animals are not suited for tanks or enclosures – even those which are born into captivity. These animals have inherent natural behaviours that are not lost by captive breeding. Even the simple fact of confinement and lack of escape is extremely unnatural and stressful for a wild animal, even if bred in captivity. These complex animals have a barrage of inherent skills needed to deal with the difficult situations they find in the wild. Wild animals need more than food, shelter, and water in captivity; they need space, specific environments, and the appropriate social company with others of their own kind.
     
    “Putting wild animals in cages or enclosures robs them of their most natural behaviours and daily stimulation that they need to live an enriched life,” says Hay.
     
    Wild animals in captivity and prisoners are the only documented cases of stereotypic behaviour, which is an unnatural repetitive behaviour that develops as a way to cope with continued stressful situations.
     
    “That tiger pacing up and down, or that elephant swaying its head is not a normal behaviour,” explains Hay. ”We don’t have to learn about the deep oceans or the stars by seeing them up close, so why do we feel that we need to learn about wild animals by seeing them locked in cages?”
     
    Avoid the Trap: The public is encouraged to support facilities that truly encourage wildlife to remain in the wild, such as game reserves or animal sanctuaries, rather than facilities that cage and tame the animals.
     
    Humans have been uniquely endowed with a sense of moral values. For this reason, the NSPCA believes that humans must be responsible for the welfare of those animals upon whose natural environment humans encroach.
     
    - Claire Winson, National Council of SPCAs (NSPCA). For more about the NSPCA, refer to www.nspca.co.za
    Author(s): 
    Claire Winson
  • Activists Angry Over Pet Shop Profits

    Animal rights groups in Germiston, Ekurhuleni, are on the warpath against pet shops ‘selling pets for profit’.

    Animal rights group, Beauty Without Cruelty South Africa’s Smaragda Louw, points out that, “People don’t know that the cute puppy they see in the pet shop window is actually the product of an endless cycle of violence.’

    Louw states that pet shops do not promote responsible pet ownership, but make their profits off impulse buying, adds increasingly, unwanted animals end up as bait dogs for dog fighting, at rescue organisations and shelters where thousands of animals are euthanised yearly.

    To read the article titled, “Activists angry over pet shop profits,” click here.

    Source: 
    The Citizen
  • Tshwane SPCA: Volunteer Veterinary Nurse

    Tshwane SPCA
    Please note: this opportunity closing date has passed and may not be available any more.
    Opportunity closing date: 
    Thursday, February 28, 2013
    Opportunity type: 
    Employment
    The Tshwane Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) is a nonprofit organisation dedicated to animal welfare.

    The Tshwane SPCA seeks to recruit a voluntary Veterinary Nurses, based in Pretoria.

    Only qualified veterinary nurses will be considered for this voluntary position.

    The position would include theatre preparation and general assistance to the veterinarians in the clinic.

    To apply, submit a CV and copy of qualifications to the Tshwane SPCA at admin@spcapta.org.za.

    Please quote the source of this advertisement in your application - NGO Pulse Portal.

    For more about The Tshwane SPCA, refer to www.spcapta.org.za.

    For other vacancies in the NGO sector, refer to www.ngopulse.org/vacancies..

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  • Tshwane SPCA: Fundraising Administrator / Data Capturer

    Tshwane SPCA
    Please note: this opportunity closing date has passed and may not be available any more.
    Opportunity closing date: 
    Friday, November 9, 2012
    Opportunity type: 
    Employment
    The Tshwane Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) is a nonprofit organisation dedicated to animal welfare.

    The Tshwane SPCA seeks to appoint a person with outstanding administrative and computer skills as Fundraising Administrator/Data Capturer, based at its Waltloo branch, Pretoria.

    Responsibilities:
    • Compile and update donor database
    • Input all donations under name and reference of donor;
    • Input all data accurately and in a timely manner;
    • Thank all donations according to appeal and/or donation received;
    • Extract data from database for mailings;
    • Assist in writing mailings and newsletters;
    • Provide donor activity reports;
    • Assist in marketing and public relations;
    • Compile and update monthly and annual statistics;
    • Support other activities within the fundraising department.
    Requirements:
    • Grade 12 certificate with appropriate experience/and three years tertiary qualification;
    • Minimum of three years work experience in administrative capacity;
    • Proficiency in English, written and orally;
    • Computer literacy in Microsoft Office and Internet;
    • Accuracy and confidentiality;
    • Strong interest in animal welfare;
    • Creative and flexible approach to work, and ability to work well independently and within a team;
    • High level of flexibility and initiative.
    Remuneration: Negotiable.

    To apply, submit a CV, contact details of your referees and motivation letter to admin@spcapta.org.za.

    Please quote the source of this advertisement in your application - NGO Pulse Portal.

    Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

    For more about The Tshwane SPCA, refer to www.spcapta.org.za.

    For other vacancies in the NGO sector, refer to www.ngopulse.org/vacancies..

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  • SA Intensifies Fight Against Poaching

    The Department of Environmental Affairs has welcomed the R25.2 million it received this month from the Global Environment Facility, to fight rhino poaching.

    The department states that the money will be used for, among other things, the ‘enhancement of forensic-based technologies’, including DNA identification of rhino horn.

    The department will sign a memorandum of understanding with the University of Pretoria to facilitate collaborations to stop the ongoing scourge of rhino poaching. According to the department, the money will be mainly used to help improve the capabilities of the university’s Veterinary Genetics Laboratory, and a broad suite of measures to combat rhino poaching.

    To read the article titled, “Poaching fight fund welcomed,” click here.

    Source: 
    Sowetan Live
  • Activists Demand Justice for the Rhino

    Several animal rights activists crammed into the Pretoria North Regional Court where two veterinarians and a professional hunter appeared this week.

    Pretoria-based animal rights group, Outraged SA Citizens Against Poaching (OSCAP), says that government has to urgently improve awareness of poaching.

    OSCAP director, Allison Thomson, points out that, "Much of the awareness has now been left up to the NPOs [non-profit organisations] at the moment. We expect government to hold constant, massive awareness campaigns to communicate the problem."

    The accused are among eight people arrested last year on charges relating to the possession and distribution of a tranquillising drug commonly used by rhino poachers.

    To read the article titled, “We want justice for the rhino – activists,” click here.

    Source: 
    News24
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