volunteerism

volunteerism

  • Counting the Volunteers the World Counts On

    The International Labour Organization (ILO) and the Johns Hopkins University Center for Civil Society Studies announced today the release of a new manual to help statistical agencies around the world track the amount, type and value of volunteer work in their countries.

    The manual, drafted by the Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies in cooperation with the ILO and an International Technical Experts Group, and with the support of the United Nations Volunteers, represents the first-ever internationally sanctioned guidance to statistical agencies for generating reliable, official data on volunteer work using a common definition and approach.  

    “Volunteer work is an enormous renewable resource for social, economic, and environmental problem-solving throughout the world, as we are sure to discover again in the wake of the Japanese earthquake and tsunami. But the lack of solid data on volunteering has left it under-valued and its full potentials unrealized,” noted Lester M. Salamon, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies. “This manual promises to change this fundamentally. The challenge now is to secure government commitments to implement it.”

    Previous work by the Johns Hopkins center has shown that, even conservatively estimated, the value of volunteer work in countries throughout the world is roughly double the value of contributions of cash or other valuables by individuals, corporations, and foundations together.

    “The ILO is pleased to be a partner in this effort to bring volunteer work into official labour statistics around the world,” noted Rafael Diez de Medina, director of ILO’s Department of Statistics, which guides the gathering and reporting of labor statistics around the world. “We see this as an integral part of ILO’s commitment to the concept of ‘decent work,’ that is, work that promotes human rights, social protection and solid social dialogue.  Labor statisticians from all over the world agreed to having this important Manual done during the last International Conference of Labour Statisticians hosted by the ILO in 2008.”

    Completion of this manual coincides with the 10th anniversary of the 2001 United Nations International Year of the Volunteer (IYV), which called on governments to improve their measurement of volunteer work. It also coincides with the launch of  IYV+10 and of the 2011 European Year of Volunteering.

    "This manual responds to a key mandate established by the U.N. General Assembly at the conclusion of the International Year of the Volunteer in 2001,” noted Flavia Pansieri, executive coordinator of the United Nations Volunteers, the U.N. agency charged with encouraging volunteer work and a major supporter of the ILO-Johns Hopkins Volunteer Measurement Project. “In the process, it will boost the visibility of volunteer work, encourage more volunteer involvement, provide a basis for gauging the effectiveness of volunteer promotion efforts, and create a more enabling policy environment for volunteer activity, all of which will allow volunteers to expand the already notable contributions they make to improving health, expanding educational opportunities, promoting economic growth, and responding to disasters throughout the world.”

    The new ILO manual provides a consensus definition of volunteer work and a cost-effective way to measure its overall scale and economic value using existing statistical systems. The manualwas approved in concept at the 18th International Conference of Labour Statisticians in November 2008 convened by the ILO, a specialized agency of the United Nations, and a final draft was cleared by an international Technical Experts Group in October 2010. The ILO expects to issue a printed version of the manual in several months. The final approved pre-publication version of the Manual on the Measurement of Volunteer Work is available at: http://www.ccss.jhu.edu/index.php?section=content&view=9&sub=12&tri=106

    About the center:

    The Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies seeks to improve understanding and the effective functioning of not-for-profit, philanthropic, or "civil society" organizations in the United States and throughout the world in order to enhance the contribution these organizations can make to democracy and the quality of human life. The center is part of the Johns Hopkins Institute for Policy Studies and carries out its work through a combination of research, training and information-sharing both domestically and internationally. More information on the center is available at http://www.jhu.edu/ccss.

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    Johns Hopkins University news releases can be found on the World Wide Web at http://releases.jhu.edu/



    Date published: 
    23/03/2011
    Organisation: 
    Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies
  • 2009 Employee Volunteer Week

    CAF Southern Africa is asking South Africans to “volunteer for change” during the Employee Volunteer Week which runs from 9-15 March 2009.

    The 2009 Employee Volunteer Week has a specific emphasis on skills transfer i.e. the empowerment of local people and communities to improve their well-being through the transfer of appropriate knowledge and skills.

    CAF Southern Africa will connect volunteers with a wide range of activities aimed at matching the skills and interests of volunteers with the critical needs of communities.

    For more information, contact Mamo Mohapi at mmohapi@cafsouthernafrica.org or Annsilla Nyar at annsilla@cafsouthernafrica.org or call (011) 726-1148.

    To read the article "Join CAF Southern Africa’s Employee Volunteer Week 2009" click here.

    Source: 
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  • Join CAF Southern Africa’s Employee Volunteer Week 2009 and…

    This is a call to all employed South Africans to embrace Employee Volunteer Week 2009 and in turn, to impact meaningfully on the many serious development challenges facing the country.
    This is a call to all employed South Africans to embrace Employee Volunteer Week 2009 and in turn, to impact meaningfully on the many serious development challenges facing the country.

    In 2009 CAF Southern Africa asks all South Africans to “volunteer for change”. Volunteering or people willingly donating their time and skills without remuneration for the benefit of others, is a characteristic feature of South African society and indeed, can be seen as the ‘social glue’ which holds communities together in the face of needs or adversity.

    Volunteering takes on even more importance right now, with South Africa feeling the effects of the global economic downturn. Our economy, the biggest and strongest on the African continent, has posted its lowest quarterly growth in a decade. Spiralling petrol, food, electricity and transport costs have hit South African households and consumers, hard. Consumers paying off a bond or who have borrowed money, are feeling the pinch of interest rate hikes. Unemployment rates are high. While so many South Africans are feeling disheartened and pessimistic, there is no better time than now for employed South Africans, to give back to the wider South African community and keep the spirit of volunteering alive. Volunteering brings South Africans together.

    CAF Southern Africa’s Volunteer Week has multiple benefits for those who want to participate and share in the experience of giving back to the community. It will increase employees’ interaction and general community awareness as well as contribute to an understanding of specific community issues. Employee volunteering also has benefits for the employees. It helps enhance the work performance, social interaction and leadership skills of employees. As many participants of previous Employee Volunteer Weeks will attest to, it creates a shared sense of purpose and loyalty amongst employees, helping foster employee teamwork and cohesion.

    In 2009 Employee Volunteer Week has a specific emphasis on skills transfer i.e. the empowerment of local people and communities to improve their well-being through the transfer of appropriate knowledge and skills. CAF Southern Africa will connect volunteers with a wide range of activities aimed at matching the skills and interests of

    volunteers with the critical needs of communities. We will also use our expertise in the field of employee volunteering to inform and enrich the great work being done by our volunteers.

    Whether you belong to a large corporation or you are self employed, Employee Volunteer Week has a place for you! Do join Employee Volunteer Week 2009. Call CAF Southern Africa and we will assist you every step of the way.

    Employee Volunteer Week runs from 9-15 March 2009, so please play your part and ‘volunteer for change’. We look forward to hearing from you!

    Contact

    Mamo Mohapi
    mmohapi@cafsouthernafrica.org

    (011) 726-1148

    Annsilla Nyar
    annsilla@cafsouthernafrica.org
    Date published: 
    04/03/2009
    Organisation: 
    CAF Southern Africa
    Issued by: 
  • Press Release: CAF Southern Africa’s Employee Volunteer Week

    In 2009 CAF Southern Africa is urging all employed South Africans to ‘Volunteer for Change’.
    Join CAF Southern Africa’s Employee Volunteer Week 2009 and…
    ‘Volunteer for Change’
    9 to15 March

    In 2009 CAF Southern Africa is urging all employed South Africans to ‘Volunteer for Change’. Volunteering – that is giving time, goods and skills for the benefit of others, is a characteristic feature of South African society and can be seen as the ‘social glue’ which holds communities together in the face of need or adversity.

    Volunteering has the potential to make a difference in 2009, as South Africa feels the effects of the global economic downturn. Our economy, the biggest and strongest on the African continent, has posted its lowest quarterly growth in a decade. Spiralling petrol, food, electricity and transport costs hit South African households and consumers hard during 2008. The NPO sector has felt the pinch, with less funding available from governments, individual donors, corporations and foundations. NPOs, particularly those directly servicing communities, are struggling with costs necessary for effective work. This sector will certainly benefit from the fresh infusion of skills, time and energies that CAF’s Employee Volunteer Week 2009 will bring.

    CAF Southern Africa therefore invites NPOs to think creatively about how employee volunteers can be deployed during the ‘Volunteer for Change’ campaign week in March. What contribution could employee volunteers make to help you and the community that you serve? If your NPO needs support please contact CAF Southern Africa so that we can match corporate volunteers with your needs.

    Employee Volunteer Week 2009 will run from 9 -15 March 2009. Please make sure your organisation does not miss this opportunity! Help CAF Southern Africa to help you access skills and developmental resources from the corporate sector.

    Please contact:
    Mamo Mohapi: mmohapi@cafsouthernafrica.org and/or Annsilla Nyar: annsilla@cafsouthernafrica.org

    Tel: 011 726 1148

    We look forward to hearing from you. On receiving your enquiry we will send a short questionnaire to assist you with working out your particular volunteering needs!
    Date published: 
    08/01/2009
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