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representation

representation

  • SOS Coalition: SOS Welcomes Parliament’s Decision to Extend the Deadline for Nominations to the SABC Board

    The SOS Coalition welcomes Parliament’s decision to extend the deadline for nominations to 6 December 2010. This will allow Parliament to hold its hearing with the SABC Board on 23 November. The Coalition is hopeful that at this hearing Parliament will finally be able to deal with the various corporate governance breaches that have taken place at the SABC. If the various oversight and governance structures including Parliament and the SABC Board are prepared to commit to good corporate governance  and implementing mechanisms of accountability going forward, this will significantly assist in encouraging experienced people with integrity and commitment to stand for the SABC Board.

    There is one further important issue that needs to be considered - we need to carefully look at the gaps in terms of representivity that have been created by the present resignations. As the Broadcasting Act presently states the members of the Board when viewed collectively need to “represent a broad cross-section of the population of the Republic” and need to collectively have a range of skills in broadcasting policy and technology, broadcasting regulation, media law and so forth. As civil society we need to analyse what the gaps are and nominate accordingly. It is also most important that the Portfolio Committee does an analysis of this situation so that the appointment process takes this into consideration.

    For more information:

    Kate Skinner
    SOS Coordinator
    082 926 6404

    Patrick Craven
    Spokesperson
    Cosatu
    082 821 7456

    Matankana Mothapo
    Spokesperson
    Communications Workers Union
    082 759 0900

    Oupa Lebogo
    General Secretary
    Creative Workers Union
    084 511 8763

    William Bird
    Director
    Media Monitoring Africa
    082 887 1370

    Faiza Smith
    Director
    Misa-SA
    076 995 9513

    Hannes du Buisson
    General Secretary
    Bemawu
    082 920 8669     

    Kgomotso Matsunyane and Feizel Mamdoo
    Co-Chairs
    South African Screen Federation
    082 901 2000
    Date published: 
    18/11/2010
    Organisation: 
    SOS Coalition
  • SOS Coalition: SOS Urges Parliament to Extend the Deadline for Nominations for the SABC Board to Ensure that the Board Chair and Other Issues are Resolved

    SOS Coalition members have been debating the issue of putting forward nominations for the SABC Board. Four members of the Board have resigned. SOS has expressed concern about putting forward new members because the Coalition believes that the current conditions on the Board are not conducive to members playing their critical oversight roles.  However, SOS believes that this is an important moment for the communications sector. We have a new Minister, Deputy Minister and new Acting Chair of the Portfolio Committee on Communications in place.

    We believe that with this new leadership in office the possibility of resolving the various crises affecting the SABC is strong.  However, in order to ensure that the Minister, Deputy Minister and Acting Chair have time to take action, we urge the Portfolio Committee to extend the nomination deadline to allow time for the necessary changes to be effected. Presently the deadline for nominations is 15 November 2010.

    SOS believes that we need substantive progress on the following issues:
    • The Chair of the Board – SOS believes that the Chair of the Board, Dr. Ben Ngubane should either resign or be removed by the Appointing Body (including Parliament and the President). Dr. Ngubane has been involved in a series of serious corporate governance breaches at the SABC.
    • In terms of the corporate governance breaches, SOS believes that Parliament should deal decisively with the following:
    • The unilateral appointment of the Head of News,
    • the Board’s decision (although later reversed) to appoint an Acting CEO from outside the Corporation in direct violation of the SABC Board’s Articles of Association,
    • the Chair's refusal to sign the delegation of authority document in terms of the appointment of the Acting CEO, and
    • the Chair’s unilateral decision to announce on SABC TV and Radio that there had been problems with the appointment of an Acting CEO and that he was hoping to reinstate suspended CEO, Solly Mokoetle.
    • Also in terms of the corporate governance breaches, SOS believes that the remaining board members (including the executive members of the Board that are part of SABC management) should publically commit themselves to scrupulous adherence to good corporate governance practices and protocols going forward.
    • Finally, SOS believes that gaps in the Broadcasting Act, 1999 should be swiftly dealt with. Parliament needs to make a commitment to amending the Broadcasting Act, 1999 to state clearly that the Minister has no role to play in the appointment of the executive members of the Board. The appointment of the executive members is solely the responsibility of the Board. SOS pointed out on numerous occasions during the Broadcasting Amendment Bill process in 2008, the fact that the Broadcasting Act is problematically silent about the appointment of executive management. To date Parliament has not resolved this issue creating continuing crises around these appointments.
    Further, these gaps in the legislation encourage inappropriate Ministerial interference in the direct management and editorial control of the SABC. People must remember that the CEO of the SABC is also the SABC’s editor-in-chief. SOS believes that we need substantive progress in terms of the above in order to be able to convince people with integrity to stand for the SABC Board. A further issue we need to consider Is the overall composition of the Board in terms of the issues of skills, experience and representativity. So for instance it is important to analyse the skills that we have lost through the four resignations and thus the skills that we need.  Going forward we need to ensure that the SABC Board has the right combination of people to steer the SABC ship to calmer waters.

    We believe that an unstable SABC is a threat to democracy and socio economic development. It denies the large majority of our population the ability to receive information and to have a voice.

    For more information:

    Kate Skinner
    SOS Coordinator
    082 926 6404

    Patrick Craven
    Spokesperson
    Cosatu
    082 821 7456

    Matankana Mothapo
    Spokesperson
    Communications Workers Union
    082 7590900

    Oupa Lebogo
    General Secretary
    Creative Workers Union
    084 511 8763

    William Bird
    Director
    Media Monitoring Africa
    082 887 1370

    Faiza Abrahams Smith
    Director
    Misa-SA
    076 995 9513

    Hannes du Buisson
    General Secretary
    Bemawu
    082 920 8669

    Kgomotso Matsunyane and Feizel Mamdoo
    Co-Chairs
    South African Screen Federation
    082 901 2000

    Date published: 
    05/11/2010
    Organisation: 
    SOS Coalition
  • SABC Board Behind New Boss

    SABC board members have scorned weekend reports suggesting there is a rift between the new board and the ­public broadcaster’s new chief executive, Solly Mokoetle.

    According to a Sunday Times report the new board is set to challenge Mokoetle’s appointment by the SABC’s interim board.

    The Sunday Times quoted anonymous board members saying they would act on the Gobodo findings, allegedly that Mokoetle had failed in his corporate governance duties.

    To read the article titled, “SABC board backs new boss”, click here.
    Source: 
    Mail and Guardian
    Article link: 
  • Maake on Hunger Strike Against SABC

    Actor-director Sello Maake ka Ncube is going hungry for 30 days to protest the way government and the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) have been spending the public’s money.

    Maake, who joined a growing group of media professionals whose stated aim is to use the hunger strike to shame the SABC into getting its act together, believes South Africans are starving for local content.

    Maake says he had to take a stand because the public broadcaster is abusing the African culture.

    To read the article titled, “Top actor joins hunger strike against SABC,” click here.

    Source: 
    <br /> Citizen
    Article link: 
  • SABC Denies Suspension Reports

    The interim board of the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) has denied rumours that four executives had been suspended in connection with fraud and mismanagement highlighted in an auditor-general’s report.

    The board was reacting to reports emanating from within the SABC that Robin Nicholson (chief financial officer), Mvuzo Mbebe (group executive: content enterprises), Mabela Satekge (head: procurement) and Anton Heunis (head: audience services) have been suspended.

    In a press statement, the SABC board says the rumours are incorrect and could undermine the processes which have been set up to deal with the contents of the auditor-general report. If further says that no one at the public broadcaster had been suspended yet.

    To read the article titled, “SABC board denies suspending executives,” click here.
    Source: 
    <br /> Business Day
    Article link: 
  • Gender Links: Top jobs in the Southern Africa media continue to elude women

    Press Release

    6 August 2009


    Johannesburg, 6 August 2009: Women are underrepresented in Southern Africa media houses; they hit the ‘glass ceiling’ at senior management and their representation wanes in top decision-making positions. Media women are more likely to be assigned to “soft beats”; to be on non-permanent contracts and to earn less, on average, than men. These are just but some of the findings of the Glass Ceilings: Women and men in Southern African media to be launched in Johannesburg today. A live debate on the findings of the report will be broadcast live on SABC International in the evening from 20h00 to 21h00.

    The most comprehensive audit ever undertaken of women and men in Southern African media, the study presents findings from 126 media houses in 14 Southern African Development Corporation (SADC) countries representing 23, 678 employees. Gender Links conducted the study in collaboration with the Gender and Media Southern Africa (GEMSA) Network and the Gender and Media Diversity Centre.

    The study found that women constitute 41% of all employees in Southern African media houses compared to 59% men. This varied by country with Lesotho having the highest number of women in media at 78%, followed by South Africa and Seychelles, that have achieved gender parity. DRC, Malawi Mozambique and Zimbabwe fall below the one third mark. At 13% Zimbabwe has the lowest representation of women in the media. If South Africa, which constitutes about half of the media employees in the region is excluded the proportion of women in the Southern African media drops to 32%.

    Only 23% of the top managers, 28% of senior managers and of those on boards of directors in media houses in Southern Africa are women. Media women have a higher level of job insecurity compared to their male counterparts: 58% of men are on full time, open ended contracts compared to 42% women. There is a marked gender division of labour within media houses with women dominating in finance and administration (54%), advertising and marketing (57%) and human resources. Men predominate in the production of media content from editorial (58%) to the 84% of those in the technical/IT departments.

    Women media practitioners through out the region dominate in what are considered “soft beats” such as gender equality (71%) and gender violence (71%) while men predominate in “hard beats” such as investigative/in-depth reports (80%), sports (76%) and political stories which are linked to promotion and better working conditions. Sexist attitudes abound; as one of the male respondent put it: “We expect women to be at home at 6pm cooking, not at press conferences mingling with ministers.”

    Only 16% of media houses surveyed said they had gender policies but few could articulate the contents of such policies. On the positive side 68% of the media indicated they would consider developing gender policies showing a commitment to address some of the challenges arising from these findings.

    Gender Links announces the release of Glass Ceilings in Southern Africa media:
    To view the executive summary of the regional report go to: http://www.genderlinks.org.za/attachment_view.php?pa_id=1127

    To view the country reports go to: http://www.genderlinks.org.za/page.php?p_id=360

    For more information contact Dumi on map@genderlinks.org.za 078 585 0366

    To order copies of the report: Contact Mwenda on systems@genderlinks.org.za
    Date published: 
    06/08/2009
    Issued by: 
  • Public Participation and Transparency Essential in Selecting New SABC Board

    The Portfolio Committee on Communications of parliament has, through adverts in a few expensive newspapers targeted at affluent readers, called for nominations for a new board of the public broadcaster the SABC. The closing date for nominations of board members is now 14 August (it was originally 31 July 2009).

    The advertising strategy is highly unlikely to enable maximum participation in nominations and the closing date (although extended now) was certainly initially too close. It did not give enough time for well considered nominations and therefore it was not guaranteed of yielding the best pool for interviews.

    A better communication strategy is necessary if the process is to produce a board made of people who are motivated by respect for freedom of expression and the media and meeting to the fullest extent possible the information, education, entertainment and communication needs of our society.

    Notwithstanding these potentially fatal problems, the best and legitimate process to select an SABC board is through the parliamentary driven process and not an elite group of selected individuals even if they have an illustrious journalism and business background. Parliamentarians are the elected representatives of the people. In this country our elections are free and fair and its outcomes are representative of the people’s choices.

    Further politics cannot and should not be taken out of the governance of the public media. The issue though is what kind of politics our elected representative should practice around public media.

    Elected politicians should practice a form of politics around public media that allows for maximum public participation and transparency in selecting a board. Maximum public participation and transparency will engender a sense of ownership among South Africans that is lacking now. It will also stop the ill-considered clamour by some that the SABC be privatised as a solution to its governance and management

    With regard to the SABC, which is a public broadcaster, it is expected and must be the practice that parliament enables the fullest participation by the public, in the process of selecting a board, that is broadly representative of our society. Parliament must avoid in anything that it does, a process that only enables the participation of elites in politics, business, and even those who have become elites in civil society organisations including labour. A process that privileges the participation of elites is anti-democratic, patriarchal and patronising.

    Maximum public participation and transparency is a process of educating people to take ownership of an institution they nominally own. Not to broaden participation this time round after the fiasco of the board appointed by former President Mbeki, is simply to risk a repeat of that process and the controversy now dogging the appointment of the interim board. It is also to avoid manipulation of the process. Such manipulation leads to the appointment of a board that is not representative and does not have the legitimacy to govern the public broadcaster.

    Ensuring maximum public participation and transparency in this process is consistent with the spirit of the ANC’s Polokwane congress which signaled a return to enabling the large majority of people to exercise power and influence in choices and the rejection of elite centred and driven decision making processes. Elite decision-making might on the face of it appear to be technically sound, but its outcomes are often not only anti-democratic but also, as the SABC board saga has shown, technically and substantively disastrous for an institution and a society. As everyone can see we now face the imminent implosion of the SABC.

    The best way to enable maximum participation in the nomination process, which is the first stage, is a communication strategy for nominations for board members that reaches the broadest possible number of South Africans. Such a communication strategy should include advertising in all of the mass media outlets including community radio stations and newspapers.

    It should not, as has happened recently include only once off advertisements in a few expensive newspapers targeted at the elite in urban suburban areas mostly in Gauteng or similar geographic areas nationally. Worse still even in those newspapers the Mail & Guardian, The Star, The Sunday Times and Rapport the advert is small and hidden in inside pages or sections that even the most discerning reader is likely to miss.

    The Portfolio Committee on Communications should ensure that larger prominently placed advertisements are featured in more newspapers across the nation, on all the SABC’s channels as public service announcements and in the commercial television and radio stations before the deadline of 14 August 2009. On the SABC stations, which reach almost all South Africans in all the 11 national languages, the announcements should run before popular programmes.

    Some will claim that such a communication strategy is expensive and in affordable but this is a lame and self-serving claim.

    Choosing an SABC board is one of the most important things that we as a society need to do given its critical importance as a public broadcaster and the only genuine means for mass communication that reaches everyone. It is in my view nearly as important as the general elections and choosing judges of the Constitutional Court. The cost therefore can never be too much!

    Second, it is not as expensive as making the wrong decision because we did not canvass for nominees as broadly as possible and choose the best 12 people who taken as whole, are not only representative of South Africa, but have the required experience, skills and competence sets to run an institutionally autonomous genuine public broadcaster, which enjoys, editorial and programming independence, from all vested and powerful interests and not just the ANC.

    Third, maximum public participation and transparency are democracy in action and there can be no price to democracy. Fourth, using SABC channels will reduce the costs while adding public value.

    Once the nominations have been made it will be very important to ensure that the process of selection is totally transparent. The portfolio committee must enable and indeed actively encourage the media including the SABC to cover the interviews live or record for later broadcast and publish the CVs of all the nominees and allow for comment and objections.

    A transparent process will prevent manipulation and the insertion of names of people who were not on the committee’s list to the President as appears to have when the recently dissolved board was appointed at the end of 2007.

    Finally civil society organisations and citizens should use their own means to publicise the call for nominations and to participate in nominating people for the board, who will not only represent their interests but ensure that the public broadcaster is well governed, properly managed and meets its mandate in all respects.

    Professor Tawana Kupe is Dean of the Faculty of Humanities at Wits University, a Media Studies academic and a member of the Save Our SABC Coalition in his personal capacity

    Author(s): 
    Tawana Kupe
  • Nominations For the New Permanent SABC Board

    Save our SABC Campaign: Reclaiming our Public Broadcaster

    Nominations for the new permanent SABC Board


    The “Save our SABC” Campaign believes it is critical that the general public feels ownership of the SABC. It is our SABC. One of the most important ways for us to feel this ownership and for the general public to get actively involved is to put forward names for the Board.

    The invitation for nominations was released recently and a deadline was set for the end of this month - 31 July 2009. Further, a number of notices were placed in the supplementary sections of the Mail&Guardian, Star, Sunday Times and Rapport newspapers.

    The Coalition was concerned for two reasons. Firstly, we thought that the nomination period was extremely tight and secondly we felt that the Portfolio Committee needed to play a more proactive role in spreading the word about the nomination process. We are very heartened to see that the Portfolio Committee has agreed to extend the deadline to 14 August 2009.

    We still feel a few further provisions need to be put in place:
    • That Parliament set aside a budget to ensure that notices are carried in the main body sections of all key national and provincial newspapers – and particularly in newspapers read by ordinary South Africans such as the Daily Sun.
    • That public service announcements are carried on all free-to-air channels including all SABC channels and e.TV.
    • That public service announcements are carried on all community radio stations and also in community publications.
    • That Government Communication Information System (GCIS) and statutory bodies such as the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA) are creatively utilised to ensure that nomination notices are further disseminated.
    As civil society organisations we also promise, from our side, that we will use our own networks to ensure maximum dissemination of this important information.

    Also, further to this public nomination process, we believe there needs to be maximum transparency to ensure maximum public confidence in the nomination and selection process. We have the following suggestions:
    • That the names of nominators and nominees are made public through the Parliamentary website and other accessible websites.
    • That all CVs of short-listed nominees are housed on the Parliamentary website and other accessible websites for public scrutiny.
    • That all interviews are televised and put on free-to-air radio and television channels at times when the majority of people are watching.
    • Finally, that MPs give reasons for their choices as regards their final shortlist.
    We the undersigned support these objectives.

    SOS Campaign Coordinator,
    Kate Skinner
    kate.skinner@mweb.co.za
    Date published: 
    22/07/2009
    Organisation: 
    SOS Campaign
    Issued by: 
  • SADPD: Digital Storytelling Project

    The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD), APC-Africa-Women and Women'sNet, invite applications from people to participate in thier Digital Storytelling Project from 8-12 June 2009.

    “It’s in the telling of our stories that we discover how much of our experiences and learning we have in common with others. Stories make our connection with others and with the world real. They weave together our individual experiences to reveal a picture of a community, a group and a country.”

    Introduction

    The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) in partnership with APC-Africa-Women and Women'sNet, invite you to submit an application to participate in a digital storytelling workshop. We are inviting people living and working in Africa who would like to empower others and affect change by documenting their journey and telling their story. 

    Applicants must be:

    • Parents/carers of children with disabilities and youth
    • Young people with disabilities
    • People working in organisations to promote the rights of children and youth with disabilities e.g. Advocates, students, CBR workers, teachers, journalists, information activists, content developers, programme officer/managers,

    Participants will develop short videos reflecting the experiences of parents and youth with disabilities in particular with regards to challenges and successes in accessing inclusive education, health, employment and acceptance in their communities and country.  Participants will also examine the power dimensions of story-telling and how we retain the authenticity of our own voice, as well as the voices of the people whose stories we document, preserve or disseminate.

    Parents, youth and individuals working in the field have many stories to tell, but never have the time, knowledge, equipment and space to reflect, understand and tell their own stories, share their responses, understandings and experiences.

    There is a large amount of information on the internet but very little that reflects the lived realities of those affected and people working in the field of disability in Africa.

    The workshop aims to:

    • Document real-life stories of a cross-section of parents and youth with disabilities as well as those working in the field
    • Empower people to tell their own stories, while at the same time create a powerful advocacy tool that can be used in their country and beyond
    • Develop  Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills
    • Enable parents and youth with disabilities to share and network amongst each other

    More about the workshop

    In the workshop we will explore people’s own stories and learn how to develop a story line, use photo’s, video clips, and drawings to tell your story in an effective way.

    There is space for twelve applicants who will participate in a five day digital storytelling workshop, 8 -12 June 2009. 

    In the month before the workshop delegates will need to join an online study group, collect content for their story (pictures etc) and begin to learn some of the software.

    At the workshop participants will learn to use computer software and other equipment necessary for making a short (3-5 minutes) multimedia digital story.

    The digital storytelling workshop is hands-on and computer intensive, requiring commitment and willingness to develop a short, personal story; learn new software and edit a short digital video of five minutes in length.

    Digital storytelling is not like writing a formal document; it’s more like creative, autobiographical writing. To see an example, check out the website:

    In order to be eligible to participate, you must be able to attend all five days of the workshop, and be able to travel to South Africa to arrive by 7 June, departing 13 June 2009. Travel and accommodation will be sponsored by the SADPD.  You must be willing to allow your story, or part of it, to be used in advocacy by SADPD and APC WNSP's Take Back the Tech campaign. The workshop will be conducted in ENGLISH so other language speakers must have a good proficiency in English.  Sign language and French / Portugese interpretation will be provided if necessary (Please motivate for this in application form).

    This workshop is a chance to learn new skills and tell your story in a creative and visual format. It’s a lot of work . . . AND a lot of fun.

    Copyright:

    All stories are owned by the person who made them. The story is your story and will be licensed under a Creative Commons license. We are open to discussing a formula that respects your privacy and confidentiality should you be uncomfortable with the widespread sharing and dissemination of some parts of your story.  We would like your stories to be part of a public effort promote the rights and quality of life for children and youth with disabilities and their families.

    Who Should Apply?

    • We are looking for stories told by parent, youth and individuals working in the field of Disability.
    • Applicants must be living and working in Africa (preference will be given to women)
    • Applicants must preferably be based in an organisation, institution or network, but individuals will also be considered 
    • Youth should between the ages of 18 – 35
    • The training is in English. Participants must speak and understand English but are welcome to produce their story in any language they choose. If however you require translation into French and Portuguese please motivate in your application.
    • The story you tell has to be about you and your experiences. It can be about situations or events but it must be a personal story told in the first person 
    • The workshop requires a basic level of computer literacy
    • Applicants must be willing to avail themselves for future advocacy work or training in digital stories in their country.

    For more information and to apply, click here.

    Event start date: 
    08/06/2009
    Event end date: 
    12/06/2009
    Event type: 
    Workshop
  • SADPD: Digital Storytelling Project

    The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD), APC-Africa-Women and Women'sNet, invite applications from people to participate in thier Digital Storytelling Project from 8-12 June 2009.

    “It’s in the telling of our stories that we discover how much of our experiences and learning we have in common with others. Stories make our connection with others and with the world real. They weave together our individual experiences to reveal a picture of a community, a group and a country.”

    Introduction

    The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) in partnership with APC-Africa-Women and Women'sNet, invite you to submit an application to participate in a digital storytelling workshop. We are inviting people living and working in Africa who would like to empower others and affect change by documenting their journey and telling their story. 

    Applicants must be:

    • Parents/carers of children with disabilities and youth
    • Young people with disabilities
    • People working in organisations to promote the rights of children and youth with disabilities e.g. Advocates, students, CBR workers, teachers, journalists, information activists, content developers, programme officer/managers,

    Participants will develop short videos reflecting the experiences of parents and youth with disabilities in particular with regards to challenges and successes in accessing inclusive education, health, employment and acceptance in their communities and country.  Participants will also examine the power dimensions of story-telling and how we retain the authenticity of our own voice, as well as the voices of the people whose stories we document, preserve or disseminate.

    Parents, youth and individuals working in the field have many stories to tell, but never have the time, knowledge, equipment and space to reflect, understand and tell their own stories, share their responses, understandings and experiences.

    There is a large amount of information on the internet but very little that reflects the lived realities of those affected and people working in the field of disability in Africa.

    The workshop aims to:

    • Document real-life stories of a cross-section of parents and youth with disabilities as well as those working in the field
    • Empower people to tell their own stories, while at the same time create a powerful advocacy tool that can be used in their country and beyond
    • Develop  Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills
    • Enable parents and youth with disabilities to share and network amongst each other

    More about the workshop

    In the workshop we will explore people’s own stories and learn how to develop a story line, use photo’s, video clips, and drawings to tell your story in an effective way.

    There is space for twelve applicants who will participate in a five day digital storytelling workshop, 8 -12 June 2009. 

    In the month before the workshop delegates will need to join an online study group, collect content for their story (pictures etc) and begin to learn some of the software.

    At the workshop participants will learn to use computer software and other equipment necessary for making a short (3-5 minutes) multimedia digital story.

    The digital storytelling workshop is hands-on and computer intensive, requiring commitment and willingness to develop a short, personal story; learn new software and edit a short digital video of five minutes in length.

    Digital storytelling is not like writing a formal document; it’s more like creative, autobiographical writing. To see an example, check out the website:

    In order to be eligible to participate, you must be able to attend all five days of the workshop, and be able to travel to South Africa to arrive by 7 June, departing 13 June 2009. Travel and accommodation will be sponsored by the SADPD.  You must be willing to allow your story, or part of it, to be used in advocacy by SADPD and APC WNSP's Take Back the Tech campaign. The workshop will be conducted in ENGLISH so other language speakers must have a good proficiency in English.  Sign language and French / Portugese interpretation will be provided if necessary (Please motivate for this in application form).

    This workshop is a chance to learn new skills and tell your story in a creative and visual format. It’s a lot of work . . . AND a lot of fun.

    Copyright:

    All stories are owned by the person who made them. The story is your story and will be licensed under a Creative Commons license. We are open to discussing a formula that respects your privacy and confidentiality should you be uncomfortable with the widespread sharing and dissemination of some parts of your story.  We would like your stories to be part of a public effort promote the rights and quality of life for children and youth with disabilities and their families.

    Who Should Apply?

    • We are looking for stories told by parent, youth and individuals working in the field of Disability.
    • Applicants must be living and working in Africa (preference will be given to women)
    • Applicants must preferably be based in an organisation, institution or network, but individuals will also be considered 
    • Youth should between the ages of 18 – 35
    • The training is in English. Participants must speak and understand English but are welcome to produce their story in any language they choose. If however you require translation into French and Portuguese please motivate in your application.
    • The story you tell has to be about you and your experiences. It can be about situations or events but it must be a personal story told in the first person 
    • The workshop requires a basic level of computer literacy
    • Applicants must be willing to avail themselves for future advocacy work or training in digital stories in their country.

    For more information and to apply, click here.

    Event start date: 
    08/06/2009
    Event end date: 
    12/06/2009
    Event type: 
    Workshop
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