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new media

new media

  • ICASA Challenged Over Mobile TV License

    The Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) could face legal action if it does not reconsider its decision to give companies just three weeks to apply for the new digital mobile television service licence.

    The latest comes after black-owned Mobile TV Consortium wrote to ICASA chairperson, Paris Mashile, objecting to the 7 May deadline.

    The letter said it was not reasonable to expect companies to meet the requirements of the mobile television regulations in the time given, and that the deadline is not only anticompetitive but unconstitutional as it is biased towards existing operators.

    To read the article titled, “ICASA legal threat risks mobile TV promise to FIFA,” click here.
    Source: 
    Business Day
  • Leading in the Digital Era & Reporting with New Media Tools

    Does your print story now require audio? Is your broadcast world moving into cyberspace? Get the skills you need to thrive in journalisms digital age. Here is a chance to learn to tell more powerful stories--and tell them online through multimedia tools. We will teach you the key skills, as well as how to navigate ethical pressure points in emerging platforms as a leader. Most importantly, we will explore how to change the way you think about storytelling and the role of independent journalism in the service of free societies. Explore the importance of natural sound and the ethics of editing. Plus, receive basic photo and photo-editing instruction designed to help you capture the images your multimedia reports need.

    Participants will learn:
    • How to edit photos for greater impact, using production tools like Soundslides to create Web presentations. Key multimedia skills, including audio, still photography and video
    • How to recognise and negotiate the ethical issues specific to multimedia
    • What it takes to survive and thrive in a constantly changing landscape
    • How and why you need to build your brand as a journalist
    • The leadership skills and knowledge you need to chart your own career path
    Contact Person: Mabatho Sekwala, mabatho@iaj.org.za or print@iaj.org.za

    Closing date: 16 October 2009

    For more information on IAJ, click here.
    Event start date: 
    03/11/2009
    Event end date: 
    06/11/2009
    Event venue: 
    Cape Town
    Event type: 
    Workshop
  • ‘Under One Roof' Gender, Media and Democracy

    This training manual is a result of the Women's Media Watch Media monitoring and Media Literacy Project 'Under One Roof', which has been running for three years. It is a project which brings together media activists, media trainers and media producers and has been implemented by our Media Monitoring Group. South Africa is in a transitional phase from a repressive apartheid system to an egalitarian democratic one. Entrenched attitudes need to be challenged in order to uproot the old ways of thinking and doing, thereby paving the way for a non-discriminatory society. The media has the potential to play a meaningful role in this process by shifting the paradigm around who and what is newsworthy, and by reporting and entertaining in ways that recognise the diversity of the people of the country.

    For more information, click here.

  • Fighting Poverty: Utilising Community Media In a Digital Age

    'Fighting Poverty: Utilising Community Media In a Digital Age' focuses on democratic and sustainable development in relation to community media. This publication discusses participation as the main interest of those who support or are active in community radio. It contains articles, audio, and video documents by practitioners, decision makers, and scholars. In addition, it argues that current evidence and experience should prompt a major re-evaluation and increasing interest in community radio by development policymakers and specialists. It also suggests that what is needed are strong efforts to create more enabling policy and regulatory environments for community media.

    For more information, click here.
  • The Freedom of impressions

    On Saturday, I attended a workshop at Constitutions Hill organised by Congo Renaissance (CoRe), a platform of Congolese living in South Africa in commemoration of the World Press Freedom happening the following day, Sunday 3rd of May.

    Worldwide the World Press Freedom day is considered as a day of action to encourage and develop initiatives in favor of the freedom of the press; a day to remind governments to respect their commitments to press freedom; and a day to alert the public and to increase awareness of the importance of freedom of the press.

    The workshop aimed at assessing the state of freedom of expression and other human rights in the DRC and Zimbabwe and discussions on how civil society organisations and media professional could better contribute to fostering these rights in Southern Africa.

    The continent of Africa has gone through good and worst scenarios. From a wide nationalist trend in the late 60s which leads to many African countries to independences; to states failure and dictatorship rise in 80s’ and 90s’. In the midst, major economic theories, financial adjustments and political re-structuring such as privatization, nationalisation, multipartism, national conferences have all been put to test. We have seen new leaders being put in place but still we can not justify or prove that citizens had expressed themselves freely and without any manipulation or intimidation.

    With the Republic of South Africa leading the pack, the Southern African region may seems to be the most “democratic” since countries within the region had gone through processes of democratic elections. In last 15 years Angola, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe and weeks ago South Africa, had national elections. However, as African, I have noticed that governments in many African countries are involved in what one may call “democratie de façade” or “fake democracy”.

    It is a fact that in Africa even when elections have been declared free and fair by international observers, if one can investigate, there is always shocking founding showing that underground so called democratic policies and institutions, human rights and especially freedom of expression has been denied to citizens or a part of them.

    For me on the Africa political scene there is two sorts of actors (players). On one hand there are those who stand and say loud what they think, and on the other those who tells you what you want to hear or see on paper but they act for their selfish interests or that of a minority group.

    According to a Zimbabwean project lawyer, Media Defence Programme coordinator at the Southern Africa Litigation Centre (SALC) Lloyd Kuveya, laws exist in the Southern region; however we are short falling on its implementation.
    Stressing on the situation in Zimbabwe, he says that this is mainly due to the fact that the institutions (courts) supposed to protect these rights are often weak, non independent, and biased.

    President Mugabe passes to be one of the most arrogant African head of state. Compared to the“quiet” and “democrat” Joseph Kabila president of the Democratic Republic of Congo, the president of Zimbabwe has always spoken his mind at the extent to deny human right to those opposing his views.
    Kuveya provided the audience composed with journalists, students and activist with facts of violations of freedom of press by the arrogant Mugabe’s government in Zimbabwe where journalists have been put in jails, newspapers and websites closed down as well as the bias of public media for the regime in place.

    Commenting on the situation of press and media in DRC, Jose de Jesus, an independent journalist from the DRC living in Johannesburg said that “Kabila regime is an iceberg”. Kabila’s government has been painted as democratic since the country’s institutions are seemingly running smoothly he maintains. The government has claimed that it has put policy in place which recognising freedom of media. As result it is busting itself by the fact that the capital Kinshasa has more then 10 private independent journals and no less then 60 private TV channels broadcasting into the city.
    Yet, the reality says De Jesus is that journalists are not free to write and voice what they have found. Journalists are too scared to be put in jail and lose their businesses. He said that the consequence is that most private TV channels are focus only on entertainment and music in particular while the public broadcasting Radio Tele National Congolaise (RTNC) is of evident bias to the government.

    However, beside violation of freedom of press by governments in most African countries, a question of ethic journalistic is to be raised. With the international economic turmoil, media houses are facing huge challenges, a choice of either go for a public interest or pursue a market goal. In some case the market option is putting media houses in a position whereby their editorial lines privilege a profit making gain or maximizing on sponsor’s and shareholders’ value whereas the public interest option sets the service to the public as the center around which it revolves. Unfortunately many media houses hardly strike it right in this regards, especially in the DRC and Zimbabwe, write the President of CoRe Ciril Mutombo in (www.congorenaissance.org).

    In conclusion, many attendants expressed their discouragement with mainstream press houses such as CNN, BBC, Africa N1, SABC, RTNC etc… and recognized the need for civil society organisations to find other venue of expression such as citizen journalism whereby citizen and community can take ownership of information.

    In this regards, concerns were raised at the workshop about limitations of such alternative community journalism taking in account that in countries such as DRC or Zimbabwe internet usage is at its very early age. Although my strong view on this is that as African we should stop putting out excuses instead looking for alternative solution and asking the right questions. For me the question should not be ‘how many have internet’ but instead ‘how many can be reached by the internet’. All over Africa there is a boom of cellular phone users for example, even in areas where there are not internet places. Therefore the development of social networking such Twitter and the use of web based bulk SMS are among solutions for Africans in order to become independent from main stream medias.
  • The Knight Citizen News Network

    The Knight Citizen News Network (KCNN) is a self-help portal that guides both ordinary citizens and traditional journalists in launching and responsibly operating community news and information sites. KCNN is a free online community where you, your neighbour, or anyone with access to the Internet, can learn to collect and present the news that you need to run your government and improve your life and the lives of others. The KCNN seeks to help build capacity for citizens who want to start their own news ventures and to open the doors to citizen participation for traditional news organisations seeking to embrace user-generated content.

    For more information, click here.

  • SADPD: Digital Storytelling Project

    The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD), APC-Africa-Women and Women'sNet, invite applications from people to participate in thier Digital Storytelling Project from 8-12 June 2009.

    “It’s in the telling of our stories that we discover how much of our experiences and learning we have in common with others. Stories make our connection with others and with the world real. They weave together our individual experiences to reveal a picture of a community, a group and a country.”

    Introduction

    The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) in partnership with APC-Africa-Women and Women'sNet, invite you to submit an application to participate in a digital storytelling workshop. We are inviting people living and working in Africa who would like to empower others and affect change by documenting their journey and telling their story. 

    Applicants must be:

    • Parents/carers of children with disabilities and youth
    • Young people with disabilities
    • People working in organisations to promote the rights of children and youth with disabilities e.g. Advocates, students, CBR workers, teachers, journalists, information activists, content developers, programme officer/managers,

    Participants will develop short videos reflecting the experiences of parents and youth with disabilities in particular with regards to challenges and successes in accessing inclusive education, health, employment and acceptance in their communities and country.  Participants will also examine the power dimensions of story-telling and how we retain the authenticity of our own voice, as well as the voices of the people whose stories we document, preserve or disseminate.

    Parents, youth and individuals working in the field have many stories to tell, but never have the time, knowledge, equipment and space to reflect, understand and tell their own stories, share their responses, understandings and experiences.

    There is a large amount of information on the internet but very little that reflects the lived realities of those affected and people working in the field of disability in Africa.

    The workshop aims to:

    • Document real-life stories of a cross-section of parents and youth with disabilities as well as those working in the field
    • Empower people to tell their own stories, while at the same time create a powerful advocacy tool that can be used in their country and beyond
    • Develop  Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills
    • Enable parents and youth with disabilities to share and network amongst each other

    More about the workshop

    In the workshop we will explore people’s own stories and learn how to develop a story line, use photo’s, video clips, and drawings to tell your story in an effective way.

    There is space for twelve applicants who will participate in a five day digital storytelling workshop, 8 -12 June 2009. 

    In the month before the workshop delegates will need to join an online study group, collect content for their story (pictures etc) and begin to learn some of the software.

    At the workshop participants will learn to use computer software and other equipment necessary for making a short (3-5 minutes) multimedia digital story.

    The digital storytelling workshop is hands-on and computer intensive, requiring commitment and willingness to develop a short, personal story; learn new software and edit a short digital video of five minutes in length.

    Digital storytelling is not like writing a formal document; it’s more like creative, autobiographical writing. To see an example, check out the website:

    In order to be eligible to participate, you must be able to attend all five days of the workshop, and be able to travel to South Africa to arrive by 7 June, departing 13 June 2009. Travel and accommodation will be sponsored by the SADPD.  You must be willing to allow your story, or part of it, to be used in advocacy by SADPD and APC WNSP's Take Back the Tech campaign. The workshop will be conducted in ENGLISH so other language speakers must have a good proficiency in English.  Sign language and French / Portugese interpretation will be provided if necessary (Please motivate for this in application form).

    This workshop is a chance to learn new skills and tell your story in a creative and visual format. It’s a lot of work . . . AND a lot of fun.

    Copyright:

    All stories are owned by the person who made them. The story is your story and will be licensed under a Creative Commons license. We are open to discussing a formula that respects your privacy and confidentiality should you be uncomfortable with the widespread sharing and dissemination of some parts of your story.  We would like your stories to be part of a public effort promote the rights and quality of life for children and youth with disabilities and their families.

    Who Should Apply?

    • We are looking for stories told by parent, youth and individuals working in the field of Disability.
    • Applicants must be living and working in Africa (preference will be given to women)
    • Applicants must preferably be based in an organisation, institution or network, but individuals will also be considered 
    • Youth should between the ages of 18 – 35
    • The training is in English. Participants must speak and understand English but are welcome to produce their story in any language they choose. If however you require translation into French and Portuguese please motivate in your application.
    • The story you tell has to be about you and your experiences. It can be about situations or events but it must be a personal story told in the first person 
    • The workshop requires a basic level of computer literacy
    • Applicants must be willing to avail themselves for future advocacy work or training in digital stories in their country.

    For more information and to apply, click here.

    Event start date: 
    08/06/2009
    Event end date: 
    12/06/2009
    Event type: 
    Workshop
  • SADPD: Digital Storytelling Project

    The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD), APC-Africa-Women and Women'sNet, invite applications from people to participate in thier Digital Storytelling Project from 8-12 June 2009.

    “It’s in the telling of our stories that we discover how much of our experiences and learning we have in common with others. Stories make our connection with others and with the world real. They weave together our individual experiences to reveal a picture of a community, a group and a country.”

    Introduction

    The Secretariat of the African Decade for Persons with Disabilities (SADPD) in partnership with APC-Africa-Women and Women'sNet, invite you to submit an application to participate in a digital storytelling workshop. We are inviting people living and working in Africa who would like to empower others and affect change by documenting their journey and telling their story. 

    Applicants must be:

    • Parents/carers of children with disabilities and youth
    • Young people with disabilities
    • People working in organisations to promote the rights of children and youth with disabilities e.g. Advocates, students, CBR workers, teachers, journalists, information activists, content developers, programme officer/managers,

    Participants will develop short videos reflecting the experiences of parents and youth with disabilities in particular with regards to challenges and successes in accessing inclusive education, health, employment and acceptance in their communities and country.  Participants will also examine the power dimensions of story-telling and how we retain the authenticity of our own voice, as well as the voices of the people whose stories we document, preserve or disseminate.

    Parents, youth and individuals working in the field have many stories to tell, but never have the time, knowledge, equipment and space to reflect, understand and tell their own stories, share their responses, understandings and experiences.

    There is a large amount of information on the internet but very little that reflects the lived realities of those affected and people working in the field of disability in Africa.

    The workshop aims to:

    • Document real-life stories of a cross-section of parents and youth with disabilities as well as those working in the field
    • Empower people to tell their own stories, while at the same time create a powerful advocacy tool that can be used in their country and beyond
    • Develop  Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills
    • Enable parents and youth with disabilities to share and network amongst each other

    More about the workshop

    In the workshop we will explore people’s own stories and learn how to develop a story line, use photo’s, video clips, and drawings to tell your story in an effective way.

    There is space for twelve applicants who will participate in a five day digital storytelling workshop, 8 -12 June 2009. 

    In the month before the workshop delegates will need to join an online study group, collect content for their story (pictures etc) and begin to learn some of the software.

    At the workshop participants will learn to use computer software and other equipment necessary for making a short (3-5 minutes) multimedia digital story.

    The digital storytelling workshop is hands-on and computer intensive, requiring commitment and willingness to develop a short, personal story; learn new software and edit a short digital video of five minutes in length.

    Digital storytelling is not like writing a formal document; it’s more like creative, autobiographical writing. To see an example, check out the website:

    In order to be eligible to participate, you must be able to attend all five days of the workshop, and be able to travel to South Africa to arrive by 7 June, departing 13 June 2009. Travel and accommodation will be sponsored by the SADPD.  You must be willing to allow your story, or part of it, to be used in advocacy by SADPD and APC WNSP's Take Back the Tech campaign. The workshop will be conducted in ENGLISH so other language speakers must have a good proficiency in English.  Sign language and French / Portugese interpretation will be provided if necessary (Please motivate for this in application form).

    This workshop is a chance to learn new skills and tell your story in a creative and visual format. It’s a lot of work . . . AND a lot of fun.

    Copyright:

    All stories are owned by the person who made them. The story is your story and will be licensed under a Creative Commons license. We are open to discussing a formula that respects your privacy and confidentiality should you be uncomfortable with the widespread sharing and dissemination of some parts of your story.  We would like your stories to be part of a public effort promote the rights and quality of life for children and youth with disabilities and their families.

    Who Should Apply?

    • We are looking for stories told by parent, youth and individuals working in the field of Disability.
    • Applicants must be living and working in Africa (preference will be given to women)
    • Applicants must preferably be based in an organisation, institution or network, but individuals will also be considered 
    • Youth should between the ages of 18 – 35
    • The training is in English. Participants must speak and understand English but are welcome to produce their story in any language they choose. If however you require translation into French and Portuguese please motivate in your application.
    • The story you tell has to be about you and your experiences. It can be about situations or events but it must be a personal story told in the first person 
    • The workshop requires a basic level of computer literacy
    • Applicants must be willing to avail themselves for future advocacy work or training in digital stories in their country.

    For more information and to apply, click here.

    Event start date: 
    08/06/2009
    Event end date: 
    12/06/2009
    Event type: 
    Workshop
  • IAJ: Working the Web

    The Institute for the Advancement of Journalism (IAJ) is conducting a one-day course on Working the Web on 16-17 March 2009 in Johannesburg.

    The course is aimed at corporate communications professionals from both public and private sectors whose enterprises would be enhanced by a strategic utilisation of the web.

    Web 2.0 is in full swing and access to the latest social media tools and communication platforms means that consumers are now exercising their right to voice their opinion. The most innovative communications professionals are finding powerful ways of working with the web to build brands and positively influence reputations. Web 2.0, Blogs, Wikis, Social Media, WebPR, User-generated content, Online Reputation Management, folksonomies, RSS, Podcasts, Social bookmarking…..what do these concepts mean and how can they enhance my communications strategy? This hands-on practical course will give you the skills and understanding of web 2.0 and its relevance to your communications strategy.

    Course Outcomes:

    • Understand the difference between the “old web” and web 2.0 and how it has changed communication methods
    • Have knowledge of current web trends, statistics and future predictions.
    •  Understand the concept of online social networking
    • Be familiar with the blogging phenomenon (specifically the relevance of blogging for business as well as how to find relevant blogs, how to create a blog and how to tag / list so your blog is discoverable.)
    • Understand Wiki development and its applications
    • Utilise RSS and newsreaders (configuration and management for ease of information delivery and use) 
    • Practice effective research on the web
    • Use social bookmarking tools to organise and share information
    • Track online mentions or follow a conversation
    • In most cases the above will be discovered in a hands-on practical manner

    Dates: 16-17 March 2009

    Time: 8h30

    Location: 9 Jubilee Road IAJ Offices Parktown
     
    Contact Person: Gugu Ndaba, tel: 011 484 1765, email: cmtu@iaj.org.za

    For more information on IAJ, click here

    Event start date: 
    16/03/2009
    Event end date: 
    17/03/2009
    Event venue: 
    <br />
    Event type: 
    Training
  • SA Students Comment on US Elections

    CNN International has launched “World View”, an initiative that aims to give voice to thousands of young people worldwide who have something to say about the impact of the United States elections on their country.

    University students are encouraged to upload self-authored videos telling CNN why the 2008 US election is important to them. All videos can be viewed at CNN’s citizen journalism website. CNN International has been selecting the best to broadcast on air across CNN’s feeds in Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

    South African universities involved include the University of Cape Town, University of Forte Hare, University of the Free State, University of KwaZulu-Natal and the University of Limpopo.

    To read the article titled, “SA students feature in CNN World View on US election,” click here.
    Source: 
    Biz Community
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