RSS for NGOs: Web Content on Your Terms

Monday, 20 February, 2006 - 17:01

If you're like most people who use the Internet, chances are you often come across new and interesting sites, but then completely forget to visit them again. Or likely you spend too much time visiting

If you're like most people who use the Internet, chances are you often come across new and interesting sites, but then completely forget to visit them again. Or likely you spend too much time visiting the same sites looking for new information, only to be disappointed. In addition, your e-mail inbox is probably flooded with messages you barely have time to read, including subscriptions to newsletters that tell you about new content available on still more Web sites.

And while you're occupied finding new content, you still want to make sure others can find your organization's interesting new content without relying on their bookmarks or your e-mail newsletter, which may not make it past their spam filters or get noticed in their crowded inboxes.

Wouldn't it be nice if there were an easy way to have all this information come to you and go to them in a way that was easy to manage, timely, and put the reader in control?

The answer is RSS, and not only can it help you manage information you want to find, but it's also a great way for your nonprofit to ensure that people interested in your mission receive automatic updates from your Web site. What's more, RSS can help you spread the word through the easiest content syndication model out there.

R-S-What?
RSS stands for Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication, depending on whom you ask. Either way, it's a simple way to deliver frequently changing Web content -- all the new content from favorite sites, or just summaries.

By plugging links into something called an RSS feed reader or aggregator, you can retrieve the newest content offerings from Web sites while saving the time it takes to visit each site. Many RSS feed readers are available, and they all allow you to display content for reading at your leisure. To see an RSS feed in action, check out SANGONeT's collection of RSS feed  selected for the local NGO sector.

Anyone interested in knowing more should read The top 10 reasons your NGO should use RSS  via TechSoup's website.

Author: Marnie Webb, Director of TechCommons - CompuMentor, ConsultantCommons.org


This work is published under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 License

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