Not Leading By Example!

obesity nutrition lifestyle
Friday, 11 October, 2013 - 14:25

As part of the National Nutrition Week, the  Heart and Stroke Foundation highlights the importance of portion control in alleviating obesity in South Africa

Most people are outraged by the recent reports of Northern Cape Premier Sylvia Lucas spending over R53 000 on food - the majority being fast foods - over a 10 week period. Although this is a gross misuse of the taxpayer’s money, the example it sets is even more devastating!
 
Overweight and obesity is a ‘huge’ public health problem that is affecting the majority of South Africans, especially adult women and preschool children. This is putting South Africans at increased risk for chronic diseases, such as heart disease and stroke, diabetes and some cancers. The rise in obesity rates has been paralleled by increases in the portion size of many foods and the prevalence of eating away from home - the South African Health and Nutrition Examination Survey’s (SANHANES-1) showed that almost half of adult South Africans eat outside the home, with more than one in four people doing so weekly. And that is why Dr Vash Mungal-Singh, chief executive officer of the Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa (HSF), describes the example of fast food consumption set by Premier Lucas as, “A dangerous slap in the face of South Africa…”
 
National Nutrition Week (NNW) is celebrated from 9 to 15 October 2013. With an increase in obesity, especially in woman and preschool children, this year’s theme is ‘Eat less - Choose Your Portion With Caution’, creating awareness and educating communities about the importance of portion control, i.e. eating healthily by choosing a variety of foods in the recommended amounts.
 
“In South Africa two out of three women and almost one in three men are overweight or obese. Results from the SANHANES-1 survey show that overweight and obesity seem to be the highest among children aged two to five years. Some 18.9 percent of girls are overweight and 4.9 percent obese, while 17.5 percent of boys are overweight and 4.4 percent obese. And these figures have steadily increased in the past decade. The link between fast food intake, a sedentary lifestyle and weight gain is well established, where fast foods and convenience meals are generally high in energy (kilojoules), fat, salt and sugar and the portions are often larger than they should be,” says Anika Barnard, registered dietitian at the HSF.
 
This NNW the HSF is encouraging the public to make portion control a daily way of life. “Eat a variety of foods at each meal, which means including foods from two or preferably more food groups at each meal. Limit unhealthy takeaway meals and deep-fried foods to no more than once a month,” recommends Barnard.
 
“By controlling your portion sizes and rather choosing homemade meals and snacks, you can improve your health, save on food costs and help to better control your weight!” - Barnard.
 
Some practical ways of controlling portion size include:

  • Serving the correct portions of food onto individual plates, instead of putting serving dishes on the table;
  • Using smaller plates, bowls, and serving utensils. Plates with a darker-coloured rim can also help to encourage smaller portions, since one will tend to only serve food on the lighter-coloured portion of the plate;
  • Using a smaller glass to limit the amount of drinks or beverages consumed at a time.  Drink lots of clean, safe water;
  • Be aware that your body may only experience feeling ‘full’ sometime after eating your meal. Therefore, eat slowly, chew properly and pay attention to your body’s internal cues to avoid overeating. Do not eat in front of the TV as this may lead to being distracted and not paying attention to signals of becoming ‘full’, thereby leading to overeating;
  • Encourage children to take a lunch box and healthy snacks such as fruit and yoghurt to school and to avoid buying meals and snacks that are high in sugar, fat and salt.

- Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa. For more information contact: Sam Mabaso, Rothko PR Marketing Design, Tel: 021 448 9465.

NGO Services

NGO Services

NGO Events

S M T W T F S
1
 
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31